Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Dec 2007 06:25 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Qt Jambi ships as a single Java library, or JAR (Java Archive) file, plus a handful of tools, including an interface layout and design tool, and an Eclipse plug-in. Trolltech uses its vaunted Qt C++ library as the GUI engine and puts Java wrappers around it. This approach uses the JNI (Java Native Interface) to call the necessary functions from Java. More here.
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RE[7]: Unconvinced
by mikeurbandz on Fri 7th Dec 2007 19:28 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Unconvinced"
mikeurbandz
Member since:
2007-10-29

> The three you mentioned actually still use CDE
> quite heavily.

All of them have officially replaced CDE with GNOME though. And there are quite a few people running Solaris on workstations.

> Proprietary apps really don't care much about
> integration.

I don't agree with that. It might be true on *nix, mostly cause *nix has never really had a solid history of applications following any kind of HIG. But Windows and Mac have. In most cases, Windows users care about native look and feel. And when it comes to Mac users, they are practically militant about their applications looking and feeling exactly like Apple's HIG says they should.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Unconvinced
by leos on Fri 7th Dec 2007 19:45 in reply to "RE[7]: Unconvinced"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

In most cases, Windows users care about native look and feel


You're kidding. Windows apps are terribly inconsistent. Compare MS Office to Nero to Photoshop to MSN Messenger to Internet Explorer to any antivirus app, to any firewall app etc etc etc. Apparently Windows users don't care about consistency so much, and proprietary apps love differentiating their apps visually from others. I mean, just look at this OSNews story on the newly bundled photoshop apps. The UI is completely foreign, once again:
http://www.osnews.com/story.php/19021/Adobe-Premiere-Elements-4-and...


Mac users are more discerning, but even there there are a few different styles that are only being consolidated now with 10.5.

Edited 2007-12-07 19:47

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: Unconvinced
by Chicken Blood on Fri 7th Dec 2007 19:50 in reply to "RE[7]: Unconvinced"
Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

I don't agree with that. It might be true on *nix, mostly cause *nix has never really had a solid history of applications following any kind of HIG. But Windows and Mac have. In most cases, Windows users care about native look and feel. And when it comes to Mac users, they are practically militant about their applications looking and feeling exactly like Apple's HIG says they should.

I disagree.

Adobes apps do not look native on Windows or Mac, they have custom UIs (despite HIGs).

Microsofts Office Mac software is very un mac-like.

Regardless of these facts, the software is still very popular.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Unconvinced
by mikeurbandz on Fri 7th Dec 2007 20:27 in reply to "RE[8]: Unconvinced"
mikeurbandz Member since:
2007-10-29

> Adobes apps do not look native on Windows or Mac,
> they have custom UIs (despite HIGs)

This is a relatively recent trend though. It used to be that most productivity applications did follow the HIG.

> Microsofts Office Mac software is very un mac-like.

Well, actually, MS Office for Mac did a pretty good job of following the Mac HIG guidelines. Believe it or not, it's actually Apple that isn't following their own guidelines. Apple's HIG, for example, said that the brushed metal look and feel was only supposed to be used on applications intended to emulate physical devices, such as media players. But then Apple quickly started violating their own HIG by using the brushed metal look and feel for everything they wrote.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Unconvinced
by aseigo on Sat 8th Dec 2007 23:46 in reply to "RE[7]: Unconvinced"
aseigo Member since:
2005-07-06

> All of them have officially replaced CDE with GNOME
> though. And there are quite a few people running
> Solaris on workstations.

and quite a few people run KDE on those Solaris workstations, even though it's not the official desktop. that's pretty interesting.

Sun recently donated server hardware to the KDE project to help us ensure that KDE continues to work properly (and improve) on Solaris. there is a reason they did that =)

Reply Parent Score: 3