Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 20th Dec 2007 10:22 UTC
Legal As we say in Dutch, de kogel is door de kerk: Think Secret will cease all activities after reaching a settlement with Apple in a lawsuit Apple had filed against the website. In exchange for closing down Think Secret, Nick DePlume, its owner, will not have to reveal its sources to Apple. The press release on the Think Secret website reads: "Apple and Think Secret have settled their lawsuit, reaching an agreement that results in a positive solution for both sides. As part of the confidential settlement, no sources were revealed and Think Secret will no longer be published." My take: I have respect for the way DePlume protected his sources; very commendable. I have, however, little respect for Apple in this case (I have written, rather controversially, about it before), and it just scares the living daylights out of me that a company can exert this much power over independent websites.
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I think the problem was...
by thavith_osn on Thu 20th Dec 2007 11:35 UTC
thavith_osn
Member since:
2005-07-11

From my understanding of the case, the problem was that people were violating agreements with Apple and giving out information that they agreed they would not.

I am guessing Think Secret didn't enter into those agreements, but some of their sources obviously did. Personally, I don't think Think Secret should be publishing that information (no matter how much I for one would read it). How much do we like it when someone spreads secrets we trusted them with.

Whether we agree with the way Apple keeps secrets is not the question here, it's violating agreements that Apple would have a problem with. I guess if Apple knew where the leaks were coming from and it was an inside job, then it could deal with them and not have to bother sites out there.

I believe Apple is reasonably smart as a company and would have weighed up the free publicity from sites like this versus loss of revenue due to holding off purchase based on rumors.

But hey, I could be wrong and Apple just want to shut down sites willy nilly for the complete fun of it and the bad press that follows...

Reply Score: 6

RE: I think the problem was...
by eggs on Thu 20th Dec 2007 15:12 in reply to "I think the problem was..."
eggs Member since:
2006-01-23

Apple should have done an internal investigation since it is an internal matter.

I am tired of the apologetic apple fans, if this had been Microsoft then everyone would be piling on. If there is the faintest hint of blood in the water near Microsoft everyone is all over it, but we could find out that Steve Jobs has been sacrificing babies on an alter made of iPods and some apple fan would try to rationalize it.

Reply Parent Score: 10

thavith_osn Member since:
2005-07-11

I'm guessing Apple did do an internal investigation, but failed to find out who was leaking the info. It is probably a little hard to find that out I guess, esp. if the person/s didn't give the info away while working.

Shutting down sites that make their lives from spilling secrets seems to be in the interests of hardware makers of all kinds, not just Apple.

Have you noticed that both MS and Apple don't hold secrets when it comes to the OS. Leopard was seen well over a year before it was released, Vista a little longer (he he)...

But both MS and Apple keep some hardware secrets closer to their chests. If MS is working on new hardware with far better specs, we won't hear about it "from them" until it's ready to be released. Why? Because they want the current model to sell... Most companies are the same.

This is especially true of Apple who tend to come out with models that are much better and (sometimes) cheaper than the previous one. If I hear that a new MacBook will be released in January 15th, I will hold off buying one now. Of course we could argue that Apple always updates it's laptops, but there is a difference with knowing it will be Jan 15th and not knowing.

Yes, some Apple fans do try and rationalise things a little too much, but in this case, I think Apple have a case and Think Secret not so much.

But just so you know, all fans, Apple, MS and Linux all rationalise things. I'm tired to apologetic fans too from all sides, including Apple. There are things Apple does that I don't agree with, and things MS does that I like.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I think the problem was...
by Tuishimi on Thu 20th Dec 2007 15:49 in reply to "I think the problem was..."
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

You really think that anyone expected Nick to keep secret whatever they told him?!?!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I think the problem was...
by Soulbender on Sat 22nd Dec 2007 12:59 in reply to "I think the problem was..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Personally, I don't think Think Secret should be publishing that information (no matter how much I for one would read it). How much do we like it when someone spreads secrets we trusted them with.


So if some company was dumping toxic waste into the water where you lived you'd rather noone at the company breaking their NDA clause rather than knowing about it?

Reply Parent Score: 2

macUser Member since:
2006-12-15

So if some company was dumping toxic waste into the water where you lived you'd rather noone at the company breaking their NDA clause rather than knowing about it?

OMG, Apple was dumping TOXIC WASTE?!!! Why Apple why? It's a good thing those moles spoke out!

Oh wait, the moles were divulging super secret product details that could tip the balance with Apple's competitors?

Oh yes, those are the same... The first threatens the public good and the second threatens a private company's bottom line. They're totally the same.

Sorry, but my wanting to know the next color of the Nano isn't part of the public good... Why aren't you whining that the Think Secret guys are keeping the terms of the settlement SECRET?!

Reply Parent Score: 1