Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 20th Dec 2007 10:17 UTC, submitted by stonyandcher
Windows Microsoft has posted the release candidate of Windows XP Service Pack 3 to its download site. The move marks the first opportunity for all users of the six-year-old operating system to try out its final upgrade. Previously, several thousand users were given access to test builds of SP3 only by Microsoft's invitation. Update: I just installed the RC on my Windows XP MCE installation, and it all went fairly painless. I haven't noticed anything radically different either yet.
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osx
by cchance on Thu 20th Dec 2007 13:37 UTC
cchance
Member since:
2006-02-24

lol if office's had to completely upgrade every 2 years especially large corporations they would never use that product thats why microsoft understands

service packs are simple clean upgrades, that microsoft releases about every what... 2 years?

On the other hand if i have an office full of linux pc's and im supposed to be reinstalling from old to new builds every 2 years ... im not ready for that head ache

Reply Score: 1

RE: osx - how's seven years sound?
by jabbotts on Thu 20th Dec 2007 14:16 in reply to "osx"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Red Hat = 7 years
Debian LTS = 7 years

(as someone else mentioned):

Solaris = 5 years
CentOS = 5 years

Sure there are distributions that turn a new version and cut off support on old ones every six months but I wouldn't recommend one of those for a business.

Reply Parent Score: 2

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"Debian LTS = 7 years "

Never heard of that distro before, or that release

Edited 2007-12-20 16:02

Reply Parent Score: 2

dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

Solaris = 5 years

Nope, Sun promises to make each version of Solaris available for at least 5 years. Bug and security fixes continues for 5 years after they stop selling it. So that's a total of at least 10 years.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: osx
by jakesdad on Thu 20th Dec 2007 14:23 in reply to "osx"
jakesdad Member since:
2005-12-28

why would it be a headache to upgrade. ;)
If you have red hat or suse you use their "satellite" servers and just push out upgrades. If you need a new install use automated PXE servers and kickstart or autoyast. No different than SUS or windows deployment services. You can have a new OS installed in minutes. With no input from anyone. But this all involves forethought. Something that is a little waning in IT.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: osx
by DrillSgt on Thu 20th Dec 2007 16:58 in reply to "RE: osx"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"why would it be a headache to upgrade. ;)
If you have red hat or suse you use their "satellite" servers and just push out upgrades. If you need a new install use automated PXE servers and kickstart or autoyast. No different than SUS or windows deployment services. You can have a new OS installed in minutes. With no input from anyone. But this all involves forethought. Something that is a little waning in IT."


Actually it is waning in management, which controls the budgets. They don't like spending money on IT, and it generally takes a disaster for them to wake up and say "Okay, you can spend that $10K now, I guess backups might be important after all." Let alone what you are proposing. I have proposed it many times here, including the business case and cost savings in the long run. The only question they even have is "Can you just re-install from CD? Yes? No need for this setup then." ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3