Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 24th Dec 2007 20:24 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes From the OSNews team, we'd like to wish everyone a merry Christmas (it's Christmas Eve in my country already), or a happy whatever other holiday you might celebrate; it so happens that Hanukkah and Eid ul-Adha have already passed, so my best wishes are in retrospect if you practice the Jewish or Muslim religion. These matters are always like tight-rope walking on the internet, but I'd like to say one thing: please, emphasize not our differences, but celebrate our similarities. And yes, even if you are not religious (like myself), I'd still like to wish you very happy holidays. Enjoy the food, but realise this.
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RE[2]: US Slant ...
by BurningShadow on Tue 25th Dec 2007 00:18 UTC in reply to "RE: US Slant ..."
BurningShadow
Member since:
2006-09-07

Personally, there is one single meaning to Christmas, CHRIST, that's why his name gets top billing for the season you know.

Christmas got nothing to do with christianity, and I can't believe that you really don't know that...

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: US Slant ...
by sbergman27 on Tue 25th Dec 2007 00:44 in reply to "RE[2]: US Slant ..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Maybe it would be good if we all just happily agreed to disagree on stuff like that in this thread. It is a time for reflection upon, and celebration of, our own personal philosophies, whatever they may be. I happen to be atheist; And I celebrate along with everyone else. I don't mind it being called Christmas. That which we call a rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet.

Edited 2007-12-25 00:45

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: US Slant ...
by raver31 on Tue 25th Dec 2007 09:07 in reply to "RE[3]: US Slant ..."
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

I too am an atheist, and I too will be eating vast amounts of food and consuming large amounts of alcohol with my family and friends over the next few days.

I also know that this time of the year was picked to mark the birth of the Christ, as it is the start of the nights getting longer in the northern hemisphere.

However, I have noticed that with all the bickering among the different religions, it is people like me, and sbergman27 who seem to enjoy Christmas the most, as we do not associate anything deeper to it, other than an excuse to pig out with people you care about.

And

Although I do not care for any of you in the slightest...

Have a peaceful, relaxing and most of all a Happy Christmas.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: US Slant ...
by Gone fishing on Tue 25th Dec 2007 08:12 in reply to "RE[2]: US Slant ..."
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

Merry Christmas

A good Christmas - a time to eat, drink, too much, be with family (or at least think about them) and generally have a warm fuzzy feeling about humanity. No bad thing.

To the Christians try not to be too ideologically committed to your doctrine, remember this is supposed to be a time of good will (I think in the UK the only people to ban Christmas were Christians) and I suppose the same goes to every one else.

Have as good day.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: US Slant ...
by dylansmrjones on Wed 26th Dec 2007 13:26 in reply to "RE[2]: US Slant ..."
dylansmrjones Member since:
2005-10-02

Actually Christmas has a lot to do with Christ - but Yule has little to do with Christmas.

It's just that we from Scandinavia has managed to blend things better (taking the traditions from south and keeping our own terms).

Imagine a Dane calling "Jul" for "Kristmesse" - oh dear...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: US Slant ...
by chmeee on Wed 26th Dec 2007 15:11 in reply to "RE[2]: US Slant ..."
chmeee Member since:
2006-01-10

"Christmas" is a Christian holiday derived from the German tribes, and other tribes, tradition of the celebration of the winter solstice. Many of the traditions -- dragging a tree into the house, lighting it, a giant feast, are all from those "pagan" traditions. The religious component is the part that makes it Christmas. Everything else is a celebration of Winter and the solstice, nothing more, nothing less. Even though I'm not a practicing christian, I still say "Merry Christmas", even my *** friend says "Marry Christmas", simply because that's what December 25 is -- Christmas Day. Not "Festivus day", "Holidays Day", or "Seasons Greetings Day", it's "Christmas Day". Anyone who gets their panties in a knot over that just wants to start something.

So I end this rant with a belated "Merry Christmas to all" -- to all the jews, muslims, christians, hindus, buddhists, everybody. Now go hug your husband, kiss your wife, tell your girlfriend, boyfriend, kids, that you love them, and thank $DEITY that you're around for another winter. That's what the real meaning of Christmas is.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: US Slant ...
by croco on Thu 27th Dec 2007 10:23 in reply to "RE[2]: US Slant ..."
croco Member since:
2005-09-16

By BurningShadow:
> Christmas got nothing to do with christianity, and I can't believe that you really don't know that...

Christmas has pagan origins, that's correct:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas#Pre-Christian_origins

"...In part, the Christmas celebration was created by the early Church in order to entice pagan Romans to convert to Christianity without losing their own winter celebrations..."

But how about reading the whole article? ;-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas

"Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. It refers both to the day celebrating the birth, as well as to the season which that day inaugurates, which concludes with the Feast of the Epiphany."

Click on Epiphany:

"Epiphany (Greek: ..., "appearance" or "manifestation") is a Christian feast intended to celebrate the "shining forth" or revelation of God to mankind in human form, in the person of Jesus."

So Christmas has definitely a lot to do with Christianity.

Edit: Original message from BurningShadow inserted

Edited 2007-12-27 10:26

Reply Parent Score: 2