Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Jan 2008 11:59 UTC
Windows "Windows Vista didn't make a smooth market entrance; in fact, nearly every aspect of the operating system has been attacked since its release on January 30, 2007. Multiple SKUs allegedly confused customers, anti-DRM groups disliked Vista's Protected Video Path and its overall DRM friendliness, and Microsoft's definition of 'Vista Capable' got the company sued. Toss in a plethora of bugs and the usual consumer backlash over GUI changes, and you'd think consumers would be avoiding Vista in droves. According to new information, however, they aren't - Vista's adoption rate over the past year actually exceeded XP's in 2001, and consumers apparently choose Vista over XP by a 7:1 margin."
Thread beginning with comment 294721
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
somewhat biased...
by jtrapp on Mon 7th Jan 2008 13:33 UTC
jtrapp
Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't see the response that the above comments would suggest. I personally used the release of Vista as the final straw to finally push me to Linux full time, but I don't think that is typical. People buy a new computer, they get Vista, they get used to it.

I doubt that SP1 is going to fix all of Vista's headaches, but SP2 will probably fix most of them.

People use what they get. If people knew how to install XP, most of them wouldn't even need a new computer....a lot of times the hardware is fine on their old computer, a fresh install would solve their problem(s). So to say that typical users are downgrading is silly (at best).

A lot of the anecdotal evidence presented is business related, of course businesses are holding off, no one expected otherwise--this is a major upgrade.

Microsoft may have fumbled with Vista--if so--there was no one there to recover the ball and Microsoft recovered.

Reply Score: 4

RE: somewhat biased...
by Nossie on Mon 7th Jan 2008 17:37 in reply to "somewhat biased..."
Nossie Member since:
2007-07-31

not sure about that... I think ms has lost a lot of enthusiast marketshare to linux and osx platforms...

I realise that's a very small percentage compared to the 'users' but those users are becoming increasingly diligent asking a geek/enthusiast about their next purchase.

The reasons for turning them onto windows simply because of simplicity is becoming less and less.. and PERCIEVED security is that much lower.*

I hate to say this, but if you watch the linux evangelists on digg... you'll see the geeks of the 'future'... usually it was just windows and mac fanboys but the linux count imho has been skyrocketing over the last two years. (digg is a bad example... I'm ashamed to visit there)

It used to be I'd have to visit ./, osnews or whatever before I could find someone using linux... now I hear them popping up on your mom and pop forums... another small recent change - but a change at that.

* Regarding security... I think most vista users feel they are losing 'control' due to constantly being asked to cancel or allow..... Not because it's that much different from linux bsd or OSX but simply because the majority of them only know and have ever used Windows so logging in and out of a supervisor account feels like borrowing your dads car keys again.

Edited 2008-01-07 17:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: somewhat biased...
by tomcat on Mon 7th Jan 2008 23:50 in reply to "RE: somewhat biased..."
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

The reasons for turning them onto windows simply because of simplicity is becoming less and less.. and PERCIEVED security is that much lower.*


Enthusiasts are a VERY small percentage of the overall user population. Given that Linux has been around for well more than a decade, I'd argue that the impact of enthusiasts on desktop choice is practically zero.

I hate to say this, but if you watch the linux evangelists on digg... you'll see the geeks of the 'future'...


Or, perhaps, geeks of the 'past'. Windows and OS X aren't exactly standing still.

Regarding security... I think most vista users feel they are losing 'control' due to constantly being asked to cancel or allow..... Not because it's that much different from linux bsd or OSX but simply because the majority of them only know and have ever used Windows so logging in and out of a supervisor account feels like borrowing your dads car keys again.


Then turn UAC off. It's really simple to do.

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2006/12/19/turn-off-or-disable-user-a...

Reply Parent Score: 0