Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Jan 2008 14:34 UTC, submitted by BluenoseJake
Databases MySQL AB and Sun have announced that MySQL has been bought by Sun. "Sun Microsystems today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire MySQL AB, an open source icon and developer of one of the world's fastest growing open source databases for approximately USD 1 billion in total consideration. The acquisition accelerates Sun's position in enterprise IT to now include the USD 15 billion database market. Today's announcement reaffirms Sun's position as the leading provider of platforms for the Web economy and its role as the largest commercial open source contributor." More here.
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Now Fix it
by Marquis on Wed 16th Jan 2008 15:51 UTC
Marquis
Member since:
2007-01-22

MySQL is riddled with bugs and gotcha's . Sun fix this crappy product. Make a backup system that is as reliable as RMAN and fully integrated into MySQL . This is why I keep turning people away from MySQL it just sucks in so many ways.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Now Fix it
by Sparrowhawk on Wed 16th Jan 2008 16:04 in reply to "Now Fix it "
Sparrowhawk Member since:
2005-07-11

MySQL is riddled with bugs and gotcha's . Sun fix this crappy product. Make a backup system that is as reliable as RMAN and fully integrated into MySQL . This is why I keep turning people away from MySQL it just sucks in so many ways.


I'd be interested in what specific problems you are encountering. I am currently working on the migration of a Web search engine from SQL Server 2K to MySQL 5 for a very well known business search company here in the UK. Apart from the rawness of the tools and the relative immaturity of its stored procedure language compared to TSQL, it is proving very successful. Speed is excellent, and I have managed to increase search accuracy by a very great factor.

The GUI tools are not on a par with Mnaagement Studio, that's a given. But as a database server, and making judicious use of correct table types, index types and server variables, and by optimising the Stored Procedures, it is proving to be a great platform. Much better than v4.

I have no particular OS/Server preference - I am an MCTS in SQL Server 2005 and will soon be a Certified MySQL Developer (next month if I can get some time off work!).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Now Fix it
by Marquis on Wed 16th Jan 2008 16:42 in reply to "RE: Now Fix it "
Marquis Member since:
2007-01-22

My issues with mysql are not about if it does Stored Procedures or what level of SQL compliance it has. I don't even care how fast it is. My issues have to do with two simple things. Backups / Restores and Snapshots.

When users had 20meg databases and they had the time to spare for a read lock for the dump to work. This was not a big deal. The issue becomes a horrid mess when you have 160G of data and you need to dump the data twice a day . A plain old SQL dump of this size eats Disk I/O like its going out of style. Now say I have Dumps / database / table , and I need to restore a dump to a new server. Say I have a 50G table to restore to a new box , a 50G dump is going to take a long time to read into a new server.

Say I just need backups once a day there is no database snapshot system. This has to be done on the filesystem with a read lock on the database. So on most UNIX OS's this can be done but now that I have a snapshot of the datadir how do I say restore one table from an innodb database ? Yes I am aware of innodb files / table , but this is adding up to a pile of band-aids added to MySQL to make it work better.

When will they address this in a proper way say the way Oracle does this with RMAN .

Reply Parent Score: 7