Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 17th Jan 2008 15:27 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
.NET (dotGNU too) "Last October I blogged about our plan to release the source code to the .NET Framework libraries, and enable debugging support of them with Visual Studio 2008. Today I'm happy to announce that this is now available for everyone to use. Specifically, you can now browse and debug the source code for the following .NET Framework libraries."
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That's pretty nice
by sweiss on Thu 17th Jan 2008 21:43 UTC
sweiss
Member since:
2005-10-01

As a .NET developer, this is a most welcome addition. Maybe now I can understand all of the annoying bugs with MS's TreeView control (maybe these are features?).

Anyway, I don't understand that conspiracy theory with Mono some people keep suggesting.

Can't it possibly be that Microsoft is doing something to benefit their users?
I doubt MS currently fears Mono in any way.

Reply Score: 2

RE: That's pretty nice
by fretinator on Thu 17th Jan 2008 21:50 in reply to "That's pretty nice"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

As a .NET developer, this is a most welcome addition. Maybe now I can understand all of the annoying bugs with MS's TreeView control (maybe these are features?). Anyway, I don't understand that conspiracy theory with Mono some people keep suggesting. Can't it possibly be that Microsoft is doing something to benefit their users? I doubt MS currently fears Mono in any way.


I don't think anyone is suggesting that Microsoft is "fearing" mono. They just made it clear that if you were a developer of an alternate implementation of these libraries - i.e., Mono - you best move along and not look at these sources. I glad they put that warning in. It could save some trouble down the rode. As a .NET developer who is an enthusiastic Linux user, I will try to stear clear of seeing these sources. Who's to say what kind of project I might work on in the future. I wouldn't want to limit my future options (however small the likelihood). Nonetheless, I do not see that as a Microsoft problem. They are free to make proprietary code, and only allow it to be seen under their terms. I am free not to look at it (at least so far).

Reply Parent Score: 2