Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 23rd Jan 2008 22:08 UTC
KDE The KDE desktop environment is going cross-platform with support for the Windows and Mac OS X operating systems. In addition to porting the core KDE libraries and applications, developers are also porting popular KDE-based software like the Amarok audio player and the KOffice productivity suite.
Thread beginning with comment 297439
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Cross Platform
by amaze_9 on Wed 23rd Jan 2008 22:37 UTC in reply to "Cross Platform"
amaze_9
Member since:
2005-11-12

I would like to challenge your opinion that porting KDE to other platforms hinders Linux adoption.

It shows people the sort of software they can expect on a full-blown Linux system.

If it wasn't for software such as The GIMP and Firefox on Windows, there would be little chance I would be using Linux full-time as I do now.

Reply Parent Score: 18

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by robojerk on Wed 23rd Jan 2008 23:24 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
robojerk Member since:
2006-01-10

I would prefer to use Krita on windows over GIMP, if or when a port becomes available.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[3]: Cross Platform
by MechR on Thu 24th Jan 2008 19:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Cross Platform"
MechR Member since:
2006-01-11

I'm interested too, but I'm worried whether the space reqs will be practical. The Ars Technica article said their test KDE install took ~600MB. How much will just Krita need? For comparison, IIRC the GIMP takes about 40MB (including GTK in its program folder, I think).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd Jan 2008 23:47 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I would like to challenge your opinion that porting KDE to other platforms hinders Linux adoption. It shows people the sort of software they can expect on a full-blown Linux system. If it wasn't for software such as The GIMP and Firefox on Windows, there would be little chance I would be using Linux full-time as I do now.


Likewise, I too would not have tried GNU/Linux if it were not for other FOSS programs having been ported to Windows.

Running the FOSS programs on Windows and watching the rapid improvement from version to version for programs like Mozilla/Firefox and OpenOffice, and also being exposed at the same time to "freeware" which was actually just "adware" (mostly download managers) ... I became curious as to what exactly was the essential difference between "free software" and "freeware", and how to tell them apart (so as not to waste my time with any more adware/spyware/nagware). That was exactly how I became aware of Linux, the GPL and FOSS in the first place.

From that point it was just a small step forward to switch the entire software stack on my computers over to FOSS software.

That experience almost defined the word "liberation" to me.

Reply Parent Score: 8

v RE[3]: Cross Platform
by ecruz on Thu 24th Jan 2008 04:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Cross Platform"
RE[3]: Cross Platform
by yahya on Thu 24th Jan 2008 20:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Cross Platform"
yahya Member since:
2007-03-29

Likewise, I too would not have tried GNU/Linux if it were not for other FOSS programs having been ported to Windows.


However, these almost certainly weren't kRandomUtility and kYetAnotherTetrisClone.

The killer apps, which usually win new believers over are those like Firefox, Thunderbird + Lightning, OpenOffice, GNU Emacs, Scribus (which depends on Qt, but not on KDE).

I cannot think of any KDE based application that would be impressive enough to be used for proselytizing Windows users. Maybe I've missed something, as I am mostly using GNOME or IceWM.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by backdoc on Wed 23rd Jan 2008 23:59 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

I completely agree with you. And, I just posted regarding the same issue on the other OSNews Article regarding Linux adoption. I won't repost. I'll just stick the link here: http://www.osnews.com/permalink?297455

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by computrius on Thu 24th Jan 2008 03:22 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
computrius Member since:
2006-03-26

"It shows people the sort of software they can expect on a full-blown Linux system. "

Thats the problem ;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by RawMustard on Thu 24th Jan 2008 09:23 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
RawMustard Member since:
2005-10-10

I thinks it's all right to port GNU/Linux software to windows, as long as it runs like shit in windows like all windows software ported to GNU/Linux does ;) Hell even Firefox gets more attention and care in windows than it does GNU/Linux, sad but true ;)

As long as it gives the user a taste of what they could really have if they ran a full blown GNU/Linux OS, then it's done it's job.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Cross Platform
by lemur2 on Thu 24th Jan 2008 22:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Cross Platform"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I thinks it's all right to port GNU/Linux software to windows, as long as it runs like shit in windows like all windows software ported to GNU/Linux does ;) Hell even Firefox gets more attention and care in windows than it does GNU/Linux, sad but true ;) As long as it gives the user a taste of what they could really have if they ran a full blown GNU/Linux OS, then it's done it's job.


Just a minor quibble.

You can't readily port Linux itself to Windows. GNU software ... by all means, but Linux (the kernel) itself ... can really only replace the Windows kernel.

Your best option is to run Linux virtualized ... but then it still isn't running under Windows, is it?

There is always Cygwin ... but that is akin to "transforming" the Windows kernel to support GNUish userland code. It still isn't running Linux on Windows.

You can always set up a dual-boot system:
http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/
... but that certainly isn't running Linux on Windows, it is just having a choice of which of a number of OS'es to run on a single machine. BTW, with a dual-boot system, you can have the Linux OS see and use the Windows filesystem:
http://www.ntfs-3g.org/
... but it is far harder to have the Windows system fully supporting the Linux filesystem(s).

Just to prove that nothing in software is totally impossible, there is always coLinux:
http://www.colinux.org/

It just goes to show, doesn't it, that GNU/Linux working in with Windows goes infinitely further than Windows working in with GNU/Linux.

I mean there is Wine:
http://winehq.org/
... but of course that is not written by Microsoft, is it?

Looking at it ... it turns out that none of this "wroking together" stuff is written by Microsoft. Funny, that.

BTW ... Windows software that is truly ported to Linux runs just fine. You will probably have trouble running Windows binaries under Wine on a Linux system ... but bear in ind those binaries are Windows applications that haven't been ported to Linux ... but can still be made to run anyway.

Edited 2008-01-24 22:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Cross Platform
by Coxy on Thu 24th Jan 2008 10:04 in reply to "RE: Cross Platform"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

If it wasn't for software like the gimp I WOULD be using OSS / Linux.

[jest]
Wasn't the gimp created to put people off OSS and keep them using Photoshop?
[/jest]

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Cross Platform
by wirespot on Thu 24th Jan 2008 17:05 in reply to "RE[2]: Cross Platform"
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

[jest]Wasn't the gimp created to put people off OSS and keep them using Photoshop?[/jest]


Nah. It was created as a perfectly good alternative for people who can't afford or don't want to pay a grand for Photoshop.

I know you meant it as a joke, but too many people completely disregard that aspect. The fact that most of the Windows software pool is made out of commercial applications: expensive, not open, with a deployment model that makes injecting malware a piece of cake. Whereas the opposite is true for Linux software. How's that for TCO? But of course, if you shop on torrent sites you can afford to make 1-on-1 comparisons.

Reply Parent Score: 3