Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 25th Jan 2008 13:11 UTC, submitted by RJop
Linux Linus Torvalds has released Linux 2.6.24. "The release is out there (both git trees and as tarballs/patches), and for the next week many kernel developers will be at (or flying into/out of) LCA in Melbourne, so let's hope it's a good one. Nothing earth-shattering happened since -rc8, although the new set of ACPI blacklist entries and some network driver updates makes the diffstat show that there was more than the random sprinkling of one-liners all over the tree. But most of it really is one-liners, and mostly not very exciting ones at that."
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"let's hope it's a good one"
by Geoff Gigg on Sat 26th Jan 2008 14:43 UTC
Geoff Gigg
Member since:
2006-01-21

for the next week many kernel developers will be at (or flying into/out of) LCA in Melbourne, so let's hope it's a good one.

I relaize this is tongue-in-cheek, but sheesh, is this good practice, to make a major release and then be unavailable to fix it? Well, of course, no one would put it in production without going through an upgrade plan. Still, couldn't they wait until after the conference?

I know what you're thinking - with all that talent in one place, any critical bug would get fixed even sooner. But here's what Linus says in yesterday's "Celebrity advice" story at http://www.linux.com/feature/124994

when I'm traveling, I simply cannot log into my normal machines

I know this is trivial, and there is no impact or danger to anyone, but it does point out an interesting difference between what happens in collaborative projects versus industry, where making a release and then leaving on a trip is not usually a good career move.

(I now prepare to lose my meager number of comment votes.)

Reply Score: 3

RE: "let's hope it's a good one"
by porcel on Sun 27th Jan 2008 12:21 in reply to ""let's hope it's a good one""
porcel Member since:
2006-01-28

Do you understand that git is a distributed development environment and that Linus and everybody else will have all their work on their laptops, ready to fix anything that comes about?

More importantly, this is a "work" conference. Finally, the people running serious systems are not running the latest released kernel and the people running serious systems have support teams behind them at Canonical, Novell, RedHat and Mandriva.

Stop spreading FUD.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Geoff Gigg Member since:
2006-01-21

Everything you say is true, and was either stated or implied in my post, which is why I said the risk is trivial.

My point, a tiny one, was that this is not the normal practice in software development. Not just because of risk, but also optics. Just try to make a major release at your workplace, and then leave for any reason, even if you promise to stay in touch, take your laptop, etc. [Note too that flying time to Australia from North America is not negligible (as Linus points out), as well as effects of jet-lag.] It just doesn't happen. That's not FUD, but reality. In any event, I'm glad to see a new kernel milestone. Incremental, continuous improvement is great and produces real, tangible user benefits.

Reply Parent Score: 1