Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th Feb 2008 22:52 UTC
Windows As happens every year or so, some juicy Microsoft e-mails have surfaced as part of litigation that the software maker is party to. In this case, Microsoft is being sued over a program in 2006 that labeled some PCs as Windows Vista Capable ahead of the operating system's mainstream release in January 2007. As part of the discovery process, a number of e-mails have emerged with Microsoft executives discussing various problems with Vista as it came to market.
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Inherent business problem
by waynej on Fri 29th Feb 2008 13:16 UTC
waynej
Member since:
2007-07-04

At work I use Windows XP Pro and at home PCLinuxOS. At work we have to use XP due to the software we run - Solidworks, Cosmosworks, etc. I find XP to be stable and perfectly acceptable as an OS.

We will not, under any circumstances, be upgrading to Vista. From what I have read and heard it would be an absolute liability at this time.

We will not spend the time wrestling with hardware and software issues when we should be doing real work!

Rather than refine their existing OS - plugging holes, cutting bloat, streamlining the code, etc - while retaining compatibility, Microsoft elected to create a new, complex OS that will need time to mature. Eventually Vista will get there - of course it will - but it will take time and in that period a number of people will become very disillusioned with the software and the company that produces it.

Microsoft's need (as a business) to make money has meant is needs to have a big launch that makes a big splash and creates as much sales as possible - this has caused a large amount of this problem.

What is a better model? Microsoft's (service packs, complete re-writes, followed by big launches and big upgrade costs) or Apple (more refinements, more often, less cost)? (or linux - continual refinement).

My tuppence

Reply Score: 2

RE: Inherent business problem
by TemporalBeing on Fri 29th Feb 2008 15:39 in reply to "Inherent business problem"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

We will not spend the time wrestling with hardware and software issues when we should be doing real work!


Amen!

Rather than refine their existing OS - plugging holes, cutting bloat, streamlining the code, etc - while retaining compatibility, Microsoft elected to create a new, complex OS that will need time to mature. Eventually Vista will get there - of course it will - but it will take time and in that period a number of people will become very disillusioned with the software and the company that produces it.


Yes, Vista will come around eventually. But to do so, they will likely have to drop some big things - Allow/Deny, DRM, etc. - some of which are out of their control (DRM, due to HD-DVD, HCMI, and Blu-Ray).

They also need to drastically lower the price. Vista Ultimate is really the only good edition of the OS; and it would be more beneficial for customers (business and individual alike) to have just that one edition with the ability to install/uninstall any component they want. (Most businesses already use an install image, so the "business" edition really isn't necessary - but it also undercuts some media stuff that businesses need since it doesn't have a lot in the multimedia department per software - so a business that needs to show a DVD for a presentation, or a sound clip, etc. is out of luck.)


Microsoft's need (as a business) to make money has meant is needs to have a big launch that makes a big splash and creates as much sales as possible - this has caused a large amount of this problem.


True. They need it to out-sell their previous release. Which will only get harder every time, and will eventually become impossible to do since world growth doesn't grow as fast as Microsoft would need to do so - nor is computer turn-over as fast any more, nor people upgrading systems that fast any more. Perhaps the Vista launch is the first to show the problem of such a dependency. Of course, that would mean that Windows 7 launch, if and when it comes, might be worse.

What is a better model? Microsoft's (service packs, complete re-writes, followed by big launches and big upgrade costs) or Apple (more refinements, more often, less cost)? (or linux - continual refinement).


Ah...the better business model. Actually, the better business model would be that shown by Linux - leave the software building out of it and sell the support services.

Apple's isn't too different, but their product is more stable and better featured than Microsoft's. Of course, Microsoft always aimed for the "just good enough" category, while Apple aimed for the niche markets, and "let's make them awe" for every launch (at least under Steve Jobs).

The Linux community, for the most part, doesn't care about the target audience; the distributors do - and they make their money on services, and thus indirectly on the actual product.

Microsoft is attempting this through the SAAS campaign - Software And [Software] Assurance Service. However, that still leaves the susceptible because they are still trying to sell the software, and thus need a big launch (as you mentioned) to be viable. It will fail, and eventually just be the services side; but Microsoft needs time to realize that.

Reply Parent Score: 2