Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Mar 2008 16:07 UTC, submitted by moleskine
Linux "Unlike the myths that are behind the prevention of Linux adoption, this piece will closely examine the indisputable obstacles and what will have to be done to overcome each of them. In the past, many desktop Linux users have opted to simply point to the hardware industry or Microsoft as the root cause of a lack of mainstream adoption. In reality, there are actually core issues extending beyond hardware - and competition from the proprietary markets - that simply must be dealt with head on. With that said, hardware compatibility and competition from closed-source vendors are valid issues, just not solid core excuses for the lack of mainstream interest. Here are the real hurdles."
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RE: The problems Linux faces:
by kiz01 on Tue 11th Mar 2008 18:32 UTC in reply to "The problems Linux faces:"
kiz01
Member since:
2005-07-06

I agree wholeheartedly. Perception is the barrier. People I talk to have either never heard of it or think they'll never be able to run it (the "it's too geeky for me" mentality).

In my experience, Linux issues are no more difficult to fix than Windows issues. People are simply afraid of what they're not accustomed to.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Jon Dough Member since:
2005-11-30

I agree wholeheartedly. Perception is the barrier. People I talk to have either never heard of it or think they'll never be able to run it (the "it's too geeky for me" mentality).

In my experience, Linux issues are no more difficult to fix than Windows issues. People are simply afraid of what they're not accustomed to.


Actually, the biggest barrier is that GNU/Linux does not, for the most part, come pre-loaded on the computers down at the "big box" retailer. The pre-loaded OS's are from Microsoft and Apple, so that's what people buy. In order to gain a large foothold, GNU/Linux needs to become as ubiquitous either the Microsoft or Apple OS is on pre-configured computers at the "big box" retailer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually, the biggest barrier is that GNU/Linux does not, for the most part, come pre-loaded on the computers down at the "big box" retailer. The pre-loaded OS's are from Microsoft and Apple, so that's what people buy. In order to gain a large foothold, GNU/Linux needs to become as ubiquitous either the Microsoft or Apple OS is on pre-configured computers at the "big box" retailer.


That would be a valid argument, but for a couple of points. First, which distro? Which publisher's version of Linux should be the one to step up to the plate? Ubuntu has made inroads with Dell, but so far it's not doing all that well.

Then you have to wonder what the current OS leader will do. Remember BeOS? Remember when they had a signed contract with Compaq to offer BeOS as an alternative to Windows 98 on their computers? Then Microsoft stepped in and told Compaq that if they sold even one BeOS based computer they would never sell Windows on another Compaq computer. Yes, Microsoft got into trouble and even got dragged into court over that, but the computer manufacturers are still scared of such tactics. Dell and HP are finally growing a pair, but not fast enough to make a difference right now.

It's going to take more of the smaller players like Asus to start really bringing Linux into the mind of the general populace before we really start seeing it on major-label desktops and laptops.

Reply Parent Score: 2