Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 12th Mar 2008 18:11 UTC, submitted by Pfeifer
GTK+ "On the 2008 GTK+ Hackfest in Berlin, Imendio's GTK+ hackers presented their vision of GTK+'s future and the reasons why they think that GTK+ has to make a step forward, embrace change and break ABI compatibility. Other GTK+ developers have also voiced their opinions, listing parts of GTK+ that need serious love, but state that they don't require breakage. Whether or not these are the things that will mark the road to GTK+ 3.0, almost all of them need attention. And give hints to the shape of things to come."
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C?
by CaptainPinko on Wed 12th Mar 2008 23:26 UTC
CaptainPinko
Member since:
2005-07-21

Will it still be in C? If so why why why? OOP is very nice for GUIs. I mean I honestly don't really care because I am KDE user and not C++ programmer either.

If it's just that they didn't like C++ they could have found some other compiled OOP language. To go on a tangent I think what the OSS world needs is a OOP language that is statically typed and compiled that is not C++. I mean considering all the security risks with C/C++ it makes no sense to use them when just getting 95% of that performance will do.</rant>

Reply Score: 2

RE: C?
by WereCatf on Wed 12th Mar 2008 23:40 in reply to "C?"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Will it still be in C? If so why why why?

It's C because it allows you to create bindings for almost any programming language whatsoever to GTK+. That's one of the big features of GTK+: to have bindings in almost all imaginable languages.

I mean considering all the security risks with C/C++ it makes no sense to use them when just getting 95% of that performance will do.

Umm, what "security risks" are you talking about?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: C?
by aesiamun on Thu 13th Mar 2008 03:46 in reply to "RE: C?"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

Might be referring to the common mistakes that newer C programmers make such as allowing buffer over/underflows.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: C?
by AlexandreAM on Thu 13th Mar 2008 00:36 in reply to "C?"
AlexandreAM Member since:
2006-02-06

I don't know if you're aware of that, Captain, but you can program Gtk+ Applications in a whole lot of languages.

You can check them here: http://www.gtk.org/language-bindings.html

As you can see, we have a lot of "Supported" languages, and many more partially supported implementations

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: C?
by leos on Thu 13th Mar 2008 02:16 in reply to "RE: C?"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

I don't know if you're aware of that, Captain, but you can program Gtk+ Applications in a whole lot of languages.

You can check them here: http://www.gtk.org/language-bindings.html


Cool. Although really from that massive list the up to date bindings are C++, Java, Perl, Python, C#, and Ruby. That's still better than Qt, but it's not that much different. Trolltech supports C++ and Java officially, and there are complete bindings for Python and Ruby, as well as for C# (although I don't know the extent of support there). There are also actively developed Perl bindings but it doesn't look like they're ready yet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: C?
by ThomasFuhringer on Thu 13th Mar 2008 12:44 in reply to "C?"
ThomasFuhringer Member since:
2007-01-25

Statically typed and compiled and not C++?

Seems like you are longing for something like the Boo language. It is Python with the above characteristics.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: C?
by John Nilsson on Fri 14th Mar 2008 20:02 in reply to "RE: C?"
John Nilsson Member since:
2005-07-06

Just to add my favourite: Scala (Very advanced type system, runs on the JVM, can be mixed with Java very easily, allows for booth OOP and FP styles in an interesting mix of objects and higher order functions)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: C?
by gilboa on Fri 14th Mar 2008 07:49 in reply to "C?"
gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

Most of the security risks in C (mostly string handling functions such as gets) were solved by throwing out huge deprecation warnings and using safe variants. (fgets in this case)

- Gilboa

Reply Parent Score: 2