Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 12th Mar 2008 18:14 UTC, submitted by Flatland_Spider
PC-BSD PC-BSD 1.5 has been released. "System Updater tool: keeps system & PBIs up to date; sound detection program! Uses XML backend to identify and load modules; amd64 build of 1.5, including PBIs that are on our auto-build server; PBI icon preview library, now a PBI file shows the embedded icon on your desktop, not the generic 'PBI' format icon; Xorg 7.3; KDE 3.5.8; FreeBSD 6.3 Release."
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Almost there, but not quite...
by Edward on Thu 13th Mar 2008 19:23 UTC
Edward
Member since:
2005-09-17

It looks good, but switching to root isn't like in Linux is it? I remeber seeing something about going to root that I didn't like. Oh ya it is Root cannot be directly logged onto by default, but you can use "su -" in konsole.

Reply Score: 1

tim_mcc Member since:
2007-03-22

Root cannot be logged into via X11 by default on PC-BSD, no.

Running all of your applications as root is simply bad security practice (for reasons that are heavily documented on the web). More importantly perhaps, by not running as root you're protecting yourself from bugged applications which may accidentally alter your filesystem in an unforeseen way.

I'm fully aware of the argument about having to enter your root password all the time being annoying. But once you've done your basic device configuration, it's a very rare occasion indeed that you'll need to be root to do anything.

You are of course free to change this configuration yourself if you disagree with it, and it's trivial to do so. Information on how to make this change can be easily found on the PC-BSD forum.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

It looks good, but switching to root isn't like in Linux is it? I remeber seeing something about going to root that I didn't like. Oh ya it is Root cannot be directly logged onto by default, but you can use "su -" in konsole.


Thgis is well intended.

You can, of course, bypass this means of system (and individual) security by setting automatic login for root plus X startup. It is not advised to run X as root, or run "ordinary stuff" as root.

You can, without any problem, login as root at the text mode console and run startx with your desired settings (see .xinitrc), or use "su -" from Konsole within X.

Final note: You can use the sudo command (pkg_add -r sudo if needed) to prefix your commands that you wish to run as root. But please note that there are very very few settings where something needs to be done as root - usually system setup procedures and maintenance require these privileges, and, maybe, excessive network monitoring. :-)

And I may repeat: It is intended this way. Bypassing means of security to increase individual feelings of comfortability is not the default way of doing things in BSD world.

Reply Parent Score: 3

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It looks good, but switching to root isn't like in Linux is it?


"Switching to root" is the same on pretty much every Unix-like system: su -

On BSD systems, you have to be in the "wheel" group to run su. On most Linux systems, anyone can run su.

On FreeBSD systems, root uses the tcsh. On Linux systems, everyone uses bash (poor buggers). *DO NOT* change root's shell. If you must use something other than tcsh, enable the toor account and set whatever shell you want there. If you find yourself logged in to root so often you need to change the shell, though, you really need to think about how you are using the computer.

On FreeBSD systems, you can't login as root via ssh. On some Linux systems you can (poor buggers).

On any Unix-like system, you should *NEVER*, under any circumstances, run X as root. Period. No exceptions. If you are doing this, you need to stop.

Run X as a normal user. Do everything as a normal user. Use "sudo" or "su" sparingly to do those few things that need to be done as root. But get out of the habit of logging in and working as root all the time.

Reply Parent Score: 5