Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 21st Mar 2008 21:49 UTC
Editorial "I used KDE as my primary desktop from 1996 through 2006, when I installed the GNOME version of Ubuntu and found that I liked it better than the KDE desktop I'd faced every morning for so many years. Last January, I got a new Dell Latitude D630 laptop and decided to install Kubuntu on it, but within a few weeks, I went back to GNOME. Does this mean GNOME is now a better desktop than KDE, or just that I have become so accustomed to GNOME that it's hard for me to give it up?"
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RE: From GNOME to KDE and back
by leos on Sat 22nd Mar 2008 02:22 UTC in reply to "From GNOME to KDE and back"
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

I have used GNOME for years, then I decided to try KDE on my laptop. I seriously tried to like it and I didn't even have any GNOME apps installed, I wanted to try all the KDE replacements. Yet, I just didn't like KDE. It is just so darn full of needless cruft..


What you call needless cruft, I call useful features... But to each his own.

One other thing I would odd in KDE was that if I f.ex. wanted to open a PDF file stored on my file server Kpdf had to first copy the file to local filesystem before it could open it. All GNOME apps I had used opened all files without needing a local copy of them.


That is strange, as in general every KDE application is completely network transparent, which means you don't need a local copy for most things.

Reply Parent Score: 7

thewolf Member since:
2007-12-27

There lies the problem, the features are useful to you, but clutter to others. So the interface is logical to you but full of noise for other people.

Gnome, Firefox and many other programs have a simple solution: plugins.

Now you can hand pick what features are available and not be bothered by features cluttering up the interface that only a few people use, sometimes.

Reply Parent Score: 2

siride Member since:
2006-01-02

No, GNOME just removes features that idiot users wouldn't use and leaves the power users in the dust. This is not a solution. Yes, KDE 3.5 could have been a little bit cleaner with the menus, but at the end of the day, I can actually get work done in KDE and make efficient use of my desktop. The learning curve may be a little steeper (but for Windows users, KDE is actually more familiar than GNOME), but it's worth it. Also, with KDE, I don't feel like I'm using an 800x600 monitor because all GNOME apps make horrible use of screen real estate. KDE apps rarely have this problem and scale nicely to the resolution of my screen.

Reply Parent Score: 9

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Gnome, Firefox and many other programs have a simple solution: plugins.


Firefox has this solution, there I agree with you. Gnome does not. Since when do many Gnome applications have plugins? Can I add plugins to give me a global menu bar? Can I add a plugin to give me a better file dialog? Can I add a plugin to integrate all apps with a global spell checker? Gnome has a set of features and for the most part they can't be modified much. There certainly is nothing like the extension system that Firefox has.

Now you can hand pick what features are available and not be bothered by features cluttering up the interface that only a few people use, sometimes.


And 99% (PFTA statistic) of users will never be aware of what the software is capable of and not be able to take advantage of it. It's one solution, but it also has its downsides.

Reply Parent Score: 5

superstoned Member since:
2005-07-07

no, he's right, afaik the KIO systen in KDE 3 needs a local copy. Fixed in KDE 4 of course ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2