Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 29th Mar 2008 23:02 UTC
Features, Office Version 2.4 of the OpenOffice productivity suite was released on Thursday, boasting enhancements to all its core components. Possibly the most significant alteration in the new version of the free suite is in the description of file types. The 'OpenDocument' description has been replaced by 'ODF', which stands for 'OpenDocument Format' and is becoming a well-known acronym thanks to rivalry with Microsoft's controversial OOXML format.
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RE: New features
by sbergman27 on Sat 29th Mar 2008 23:44 UTC in reply to "New features"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Yeah. One of my users has been whining about how she needs MS Office and can't use OpenOffice 2.3 because the spreadsheet doesn't have drag 'n drop reordering of columns. This should silence that feeble excuse.

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[2]: New features
by sappyvcv on Sun 30th Mar 2008 01:51 in reply to "RE: New features"
sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

Damn those whining users that you're being paid to support and help to do their job. Always whining and not using *my* preferred software.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: New features
by sbergman27 on Sun 30th Mar 2008 02:09 in reply to "RE[2]: New features"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Damn those whining users that you're being paid to support and help to do their job. Always whining and not using *my* preferred software.

1. They are not paying me. Their employers are. And they appreciate not having to shell out for 60+ MS Office licenses + upgrades.

2. The other 60 some odd users have no problems or complaints about using OO.o and are able to do their jobs just fine. The one employee in question is also quite able to do her job with the current tools available. Drag 'n Drop column rearrangement, available in 2.4, is a nice convenience, but the lack in 2.3 is simply not a show stopper.

Nice try, but my professional conscience is quite clear.

Edited 2008-03-30 02:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 20

RE[3]: New features
by evangs on Sun 30th Mar 2008 17:23 in reply to "RE[2]: New features"
evangs Member since:
2005-07-07

At the end of the day, I think it depends on the kind of job that is being done. For example, if you're working as a quant in some big financial firm, no employer is going to begrudge you the software you need. The amount of money you make each day for the company is easily enough to cover the cost of a license. On the other hand, if you're working in a small business where the turnover is considerably smaller, the price of an MS Office site license can be prohibitive. Shelling out $500 for just one staff member can be quite an expensive prospect.

So the question that really needs to be answered is whether the switch to MS office will increase productivity enough to justify the price of a license?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: New features
by raver31 on Sun 30th Mar 2008 08:49 in reply to "RE: New features"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

I simply cannot be expected to change from one system to another, the outside world is all bright and scary !

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: New features
by Doc Pain on Mon 31st Mar 2008 13:04 in reply to "RE[2]: New features"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I simply cannot be expected to change from one system to another, the outside world is all bright and scary !


That would be nearly my point. The users I have to support are using OpenOffice for some years now, they're using it cross-platform - the same application and the same files on Linux, BSD, Solaris and, yes, it's true, on "Windows"; some of them who had tried a MICROS~1 office product started complaining: "Hey, this can't export to PDF!" or "Automatic sectioning, numbering and referencing leads to strange results." up to "You tell me: Why is it sooo slow?!" And the best one: "What's this? It doesn't support Linux?!" :-)

From my individual experience, OpenOffice is a great office suite. For real typesetting success I still prefer LaTeX.

Thanks to ODF, stand-alone applications can produce OpenOffice documents as their output (!) so they can be opened, changed and saved (!) with OpenOffice. For some appliances, this is a real good idea.

The development of new features is impressing, but that's what I always may say: Home users treat their office applications (no matter who made them) like a worse typewriter; they won't benefit from it, because they don't want to enter the "bright and scary" world of document and section templates, adjustable margins, multicolumn alignment and automatic enumeration. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2