Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Apr 2008 22:40 UTC
Windows Microsoft will shutter its Windows XP line June 30, as planned, ceasing sales of Windows XP Professional and Windows XP Home to retailers and direct OEMs, Microsoft confirmed to eWEEK April 3. The statement from Redmond executives ends weeks of speculation that Microsoft would extend the life of the operating system as users turn up their nose at Vista, the operating system meant to supplant XP, and OEMs argue lighter versions of desktops and notebooks don't have the juice to run Vista.
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RE[4]: Not quite
by zugu on Fri 4th Apr 2008 17:15 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Not quite"
zugu
Member since:
2007-08-28

You don't get it, do you?

Microsoft's success comes from the very fact that the Windows operating system is barebone after the installation. And then the user can add whatever he likes, without fear of bloat.

Now compare this with Linux distributions, where after installation I'm left with software that I don't want.

This kitchen sink approach occurs because in most of the cases Linux distributions are closed systems. Since nobody packages software, apart from the distribution maintainers, the wheel is bound to be reinvented for each distro. A repository is centralized and whatever software resides on the installation media is just a part of that repository. Usually, the stable repositories are frozen and new versions of the different applications and programs do not receive new features.

What good is apt-get then? Yeah, it installs whatever I command it to install, but what if I get more specific and want a certain version of Pidgin? Sorry, that can't be done because it would break the package manager database. Actually, one can really break the OS by mixing repositories. Thank you, but no, thank you. I choose the Windows / Mac OS X approach any day.

With a fresh install of Windows or OS X I can play in any way I want and I am free to install whatever I like. No locked repositories, no fear of breaking system libraries simply by installing a package. This is real freedom and real decentralization. I dare to say this is more in the spirit of free software than the Linux distribution approach is.

"Ubuntu Linux pre-installed comes with a complete desktop application suite and heaps of tools and utilities." - yeah, and pretty much that's it. Oh, I forgot, there's more in the repositories. Pushing beyond this limit breaks the repository system.

Look at Ubuntu Dapper: in order for users to use Firefox 2, the official documentation requires an upgrade to the next release. The whole frigging operating system for a newer version of the browser. Same is going to happen with the current stable release of Ubuntu and Firefox 3. Same is true for Debian and other prominent distributions. It makes baby Jesus cry.

I used Linux for more than a year and deleted it from my HDD when I realized I was actually spending more time making various things to work instead of actually getting things done. What a bummer for productivity.

Linux: a colossal waste of time for the pragmatist.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[5]: Not quite
by ari-free on Fri 4th Apr 2008 19:32 in reply to "RE[4]: Not quite"
ari-free Member since:
2007-01-22

I think is a fundamental problem of linux that can't simply be fixed by some clever changes and fixes to Gnome or the kernel. Linux has highly talented people to fix the technical problems but this is more of a political problem.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Not quite
by UltraZelda64 on Fri 4th Apr 2008 20:43 in reply to "RE[4]: Not quite"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

You don't get it, do you?

Microsoft's success comes from the very fact that the Windows operating system is barebone after the installation. And then the user can add whatever he likes, without fear of bloat.

I cringe just thinking about the amount of research I've done, the number of reviews I've read, the trial and error installing and uninstalling potential software candidates, and screwed up Windows installs in the process... just to find decent, non-bloated replacements to the crap Microsoft gives you by default (or not at all).

I eventually gave up my search (after finally finding a nice set of lightweight apps) because no matter what, Windows decided to eat up virtual memory like candy on my RAM-starved system (about 200+ megs on boot alone). Plus several dozen other reasons, but I won't get into those. Either way, I'll just say... it was a bitch trying to find such non-bloated software in Windows.

Now compare this with Linux distributions, where after installation I'm left with software that I don't want.

It sounds like you're complaining because you chose the wrong distro. Too bad. Here running Zenwalk, I found just what I needed to run my system nicely, rarely eating into swap, and in general running much better than XP did on this system when all the programs I wanted to run were installed. It's not perfect, and it's still not enough memory for what I would *like* to do, but it's certainly an improvement in overall performance over the days when it ran XP.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Not quite
by lemur2 on Sat 5th Apr 2008 01:02 in reply to "RE[4]: Not quite"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

You don't get it, do you?

Microsoft's success comes from the very fact that the Windows operating system is barebone after the installation. And then the user can add whatever he likes, without fear of bloat.


You have got to be joking!

Windows Vista is something like 15GB ... for a barebones install !!!

Talk about bloat. Even Microsoft admits that Vista is not suitable for devices which they have labelled as "ULCPCs" ... yet those devices can come with 512MB RAM, 12GB solid-state disk and have a processor > 1GHz.

Linux systems in general are very easy to keep up to date without breakage ... I have no idea why you would want to FUD about that issue.

What is more ... on a Linux system it is far easier to remove any software which does not appeal. One minute with the package manager software will do it. Just try removing WMP or IE from Windows without breaking it, and see how you go.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: Not quite
by zugu on Sat 5th Apr 2008 09:29 in reply to "RE[5]: Not quite"
zugu Member since:
2007-08-28

If you had bothered to read my previous posts, you would have seen my previous stance on Vista. However, in a few years Vista is going to be the standard, and by then the hardware manufacturers would have to be crazy not to support it, or release buggy drivers for it.

Reply Parent Score: 1