Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 6th Apr 2008 09:38 UTC, submitted by Francis Kuntz
Windows Ars analyses the concept of a modular Windows, and concludes: "Modularization - and the discriminatory pricing it permits - might appeal to accountants and economists. But it is bad for consumers, bad for Windows, and ultimately, bad for Microsoft. A modularized Windows, or worse still, a modularized subscription-based Windows, undermines the purpose and value of the Windows OS. If it comes to pass it will surely sound the death knell of the entire Windows platform."
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RE: Comment by Darkmage
by Lennie on Sun 6th Apr 2008 14:13 UTC in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
Lennie
Member since:
2007-09-22

What is wrong with Unix(-like) again ?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by Darkmage on Sun 6th Apr 2008 14:38 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
Darkmage Member since:
2006-10-20

I'm not saying unix-alike is bad, but I do feel it will be unfortunate if the only "man" standing at the end of the OS wars is unix-alike. I'd like to see various other OS implementations appear. I don't want to see the next 20 years be all *nix. A nice varied ecosystem is a good thing, as we've all seen the prevalence of windows systems leading to a hellstorm of viruses/malware. I'm interested in seeing what other vendors/groups can come up with that's neither linux/mac/windows. No system is perfect yet. I'd like to see what people come up with given a chance to explore other models.

Edited 2008-04-06 14:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Darkmage
by Hands on Sun 6th Apr 2008 15:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage"
Hands Member since:
2005-06-30

I would hazard a guess that if Windows were to decline by 50% over the next several years, the largest benefit would be to Apple simply because most people still think you have to pay for an OS, but Linux would also benefit enough that the split might be something like 46-36-13-5 (Windows-Mac-Linux-Other).

The mere fact that Apple is gaining mindshare at Windows' expense helps people to realize that a computer doesn't have to run Windows. And, the fact that Windows can easily be installed on current Apple hardware, makes it much easier for many people to understand that the major difference between Apple and Windows is a difference in software rather than hardware (Windows boxes can be designed well too).

This opens the door for people to ask if there are any other options. The obvious alternative to Windows and Mac is Linux, but many would argue that the BSDs and Solaris are very good alternatives as well. Of course, all of those fall under the category of being Unix or Unix-like, but I say that it would also make people more open to trying other systems.

If that were the result of Microsoft trying to modularize Windows for profit, I would be all for it. It would pave the way not only for an increase in *nix usage, but it would make the development of more alternatives increasingly likely. Competition would truly be king.

Reply Parent Score: 2

v RE[3]: Comment by Darkmage
by Almafeta on Sun 6th Apr 2008 15:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage"
RE[3]: Comment by Darkmage
by siride on Sun 6th Apr 2008 15:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

There's so much more to Linux and especially Mac OS X that's not really Unix of yore that I think you are doing a disservice to these OSes by calling them holdovers from the 70s. Yes, the Mac OS X kernel is Unix-based, but even that is a lot different from the Unix you'll remember from the 70s. Almost the entire userland is not Unix, it is very modern and very different from the traditional Unix userland. That's where it counts these days anyways. The Linux userland is a more unix-y, but even so, it is still quite a bit more modern than you seem to be making it out to be.

I think at this point, saying that "all that will be left standing is Unix" is akin to saying "all that will be left standing is virtual memory based kernels". Yes, all mainstream kernels use virtual memory with paging. So? That's the solution that the the industry has adopted to solve the problem. Same with other Unix-y stuff. Even Windows got a lot more Unix-y with NT and later. A lot of things we take for granted as "how a system should work" were developed first with Multics and Unix.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by Darkmage
by l3v1 on Sun 6th Apr 2008 16:29 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

I do feel it will be unfortunate if the only "man" standing at the end of the OS wars is unix-alike. I'd like to see various other OS implementations appear. I don't want to see the next 20 years be all *nix. A nice varied ecosystem is a good thing


Forgive me saying it out loud, but some of you people just need to get a cluebat and start hitting the wall at least. For far too many years has the consumer OS land been dominated by a single OS, and hey, a real minor number of people kept repeating that a varied OS landscape would be better. Now, that suddenly some people have woken up, and we start to see some light at the end of the tunnel - and we're still pretty far off to having a varied OS ecosystem (availability in itself means nothing) -, people pop up and start complaining that reducing the lead of Windows as an OS (reducing, not eliminating) will bring us doom, and we should have something, anything just not unix/linux-based OSes. It's just funny.

As regarding the subscription-based plans for Windows... my feeling about that are just skeptical. You see, even MS acknowledges that a very high percentage of the OS-income comes not from individual OS-buyers, but from OEMs and companies. For home users this subscription-based Windows will probably be a major pain in their proverbial behinds, and even more so if we consider that bugs and glitches in the respective services will take your patience by its neck, twist it around, spit on it and bust its face with a twenty inch steel-toe. For companies, well, I don't think a sane cio/cto will go into such a mess. I might be wrong, we'll see (unfortunately).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by Darkmage
by Sunnz on Wed 9th Apr 2008 14:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage"
Sunnz Member since:
2008-04-09

Haiku OS?

Reply Parent Score: 1