Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 13th Apr 2008 16:29 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Every now and then, a computer comes along that makes a mark, that sets a trend, or that simply stuns you - but not because of its internals, its processor or its software, but because of its appearance. Through the history of computing, there have been a number of computers that were actually designed to appeal not just because of raw technology alone, but also because of stunning looks. Read on for a countdown of my ten most beautiful computers.
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Pizza boxes
by nonesuch on Mon 14th Apr 2008 01:56 UTC
nonesuch
Member since:
2007-11-13

I miss the pizzabox form factor. I definitely second the suggestion of the SparcStation 20, but I would submit that the PS/2 model 55 looks nicer than the model 50: http://john.ccac.rwth-aachen.de:8000/alf/ps2_55sx/ . Maybe just because its slimmer. I took mine apart and it was beautiful on the inside too: everything was packed in wonderfully, and solidly built.

Also, the Apple IIc+ was a real stunner: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_IIc_Plus . Gorgeous.

Also Thom: you mentioned the Macbook Air, but are you aware of the Sony Vaio x505? http://www.mobiletechreview.com/notebooks/sony_vaio_X505.htm . How does that affect your belief that laptops are ugly?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Pizza boxes
by Doc Pain on Mon 14th Apr 2008 07:47 in reply to "Pizza boxes"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I miss the pizzabox form factor. I definitely second the suggestion of the SparcStation 20, [...]


I think that's why a friend of mine is actually putting a modern x86 system (attention, may be seen as oxymoron!) into an KC85 pizzabox built by RFT, along with a silent PSU, a slot-in optical media drive and a 2,5" HDD.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3d/Kc85-3.jpg...

It features a "new" front that will look at is has been produced in the GDR, but have all the functionality needed by the new system (PS/2 and USB ports, card reader, status LEDs).

Another concept common to the pizzabox form factor systens: They usually came equipped with a certain set of hardware, and if you wanted to extend it, you usually used external devices. Ah yes, and that's how you added a CD recorder to the SGI Octane, too. This concept is nice in some regards, because it allows you to change the system configuration without having to open the case. Replacement of a defective external drive is very easy.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Pizza boxes
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 14th Apr 2008 08:53 in reply to "Pizza boxes"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Also Thom: you mentioned the Macbook Air, but are you aware of the Sony Vaio x505? http://www.mobiletechreview.com/notebooks/sony_vaio_X505.htm . How does that affect your belief that laptops are ugly?


It doesn't ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Pizza boxes
by CharAznable on Mon 14th Apr 2008 14:13 in reply to "Pizza boxes"
CharAznable Member since:
2005-07-06

When I was like 7 years old, living in San Jose, Costa Rica, my dad took me to a computer show. The first booth we saw as we walked in was Apple. When I saw the IIC, with its monitor, I almost crapped my pants. It was sleek and beautiful. We walked out with a 512k Mac though. I wasn't too happy but in retrospect it was probably the right decision.

Reply Parent Score: 1