Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Apr 2008 21:44 UTC
Apple The website of a Miami-based networking and security solutions reseller became inaccessible Monday, shortly after the company began advertising an unauthorized Mac clone for a fraction of the cost of Apple's cheapest system. Dubbed OpenMac, the USD 400 offering from Psystar Corporation is described as 'a low-cost high-performance computing platform' based on the ongoing OSX86Project - a hacker-based initiative aimed at maintaining a version of the Mac OS X operating system for everyday PCs. The website is back online now, and the machine has been renamed to Open Computer. Update: Psystar says they will continue to sell the Open Computer system, despite the fact that it appears to violate Apple's EULA. "We're not breaking any laws," they insisted.
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RE[4]: Cease and Desist
by jasutton on Tue 15th Apr 2008 04:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Cease and Desist"
jasutton
Member since:
2006-03-28

And hope they succeed in what? Toppling Apple? Then nobody gets the OS. Unless Apple _stops_ being a _hardware_ company hoping to see the little guy succeed is hoping to bring the company down.


The OS sells Macs, but recently, Apple has been making the majority of it's revenue from iPod+iTunes sales. It probably wouldn't affect them much to "allow" people to install OS X on third-party systems. This is especially true given the fact that most people that buy Macs in recent years do so more as a fashion statement than anything else.

That said, Apple has the right to create their OS in such a way that it is difficult to install on third-party hardware. However, I as the purchaser of the software have the right (see quote from Title 17 section 117 of the US Code below) to modify that software in order to run it on a computer.

"it is not an infringement for the owner of a copy of a computer program to make or authorize the making of another copy or adaptation of that computer program provided that such a new copy or adaptation is created as an essential step in the utilization of the computer program in conjunction with a machine"

Link: http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/usc_sec_17_00000117----000-.h...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: Cease and Desist
by droidix on Tue 15th Apr 2008 05:05 in reply to "RE[4]: Cease and Desist"
droidix Member since:
2008-03-13

That's an excellent point, and straight from the law. I've read this passage before but must of missed the adaptation clause, which is essential for the legality of a hackintosh.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Cease and Desist
by the_thunderbird on Tue 15th Apr 2008 13:43 in reply to "RE[4]: Cease and Desist"
the_thunderbird Member since:
2005-08-19

Where the heck did you get the idea that Apple makes most of it's money from the iPod and iTunes?

Most of it's money comes from Macs and always has come from Macs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Cease and Desist
by Vinegar Joe on Tue 15th Apr 2008 14:09 in reply to "RE[5]: Cease and Desist"
Vinegar Joe Member since:
2006-08-16

Where the heck did you get the idea that Apple makes most of it's money from the iPod and iTunes?

Most of it's money comes from Macs and always has come from Macs.


From 2006:

"Apple's music-related business accounted for 59 percent of the company's total revenue and was up 145 percent compared to same period a year ago."

http://www.mp3.com/stories/2946.html

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Cease and Desist
by Johann Chua on Wed 16th Apr 2008 04:41 in reply to "RE[5]: Cease and Desist"
Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Most of it's money comes from Macs and always has come from Macs.


Even years after the Mac debuted Apple made most of its money from the Apple II family.

Reply Parent Score: 2