Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Apr 2008 11:38 UTC
Windows When Vista was released, and the first reviews started to trickle in, it became apparent that Vista was a massive release - not only in terms of money spent on it by Microsoft and the amount of promotion, but also the operating system itself. It was huge, and it felt as such too. Despite what many have been saying the past year, Vista is, in fact, much more than just XP with a new theme. Basically every framework and feature has been rewritten, lots of new ones have been added, and, according to some, the process of modularisation has started with Vista (and Server 2008). It may come as no surprise that all these changes resulted in a whole boatload of bugs and breakage, which led many people to conclude that Vista was simply not as "done" as it should have been when released. Steve Ballmer confirmed these sentiments in a speech at Microsoft's Most Valuable Professionals conference in Seattle.
Thread beginning with comment 310310
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: meh
by tech10171968 on Fri 18th Apr 2008 15:02 UTC in reply to "RE: meh"
tech10171968
Member since:
2007-05-22

I think the better question to ask is this; why was it sold as being 'finished' when its actually still 'work in progress'.

I'm surprised that people are just now asking this question; Microsoft has done this with their last few iterations of Windows. It's as if the customers are being used as beta testers and don't even know it.

Edited 2008-04-18 15:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: meh
by kaiwai on Fri 18th Apr 2008 16:54 in reply to "RE[2]: meh"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think the better question to ask is this; why was it sold as being 'finished' when its actually still 'work in progress'.

I'm surprised that people are just now asking this question; Microsoft has done this with their last few iterations of Windows. It's as if the customers are being used as beta testers and don't even know it.


Of course, which is why I find it funny the number of, at least enterprise customers, who claim that they 'depend on Microsoft' when it is THEM who embrace pointless garbage applications like SharePoint that do zilch to improve productivity and only there to further integrate and ingrain Microsoft products into that said work place. The only one who benefits from these garbage applications is Microsoft, the consumer itself receives very little (if any) benefit from it.

The same people who go on about how the above (Windows Vista is work in progress) are the same idiots who deploy exchange servers when there are literally HUNDREDS of replacements, they go on about needing Outlook but never actually quantifiably justify the costs when it boils down to the alternatives and what they can provide.

I mean, sure, the consumer doesn't have much choice (due to the diversity of what they expect out of their computer) but when it comes to the enterprise, it is well served by non-Microsoft operating systems and Office suite. It is the establishment and the establishments vested interest in the status quo which keeps Microsoft ingrained, nothing with a so-called superior solution (as some Microsoft fan boys will make out).

PS. Sorry I turned this into a giant rant (and off-topic in the process ;) )

Edited 2008-04-18 16:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3