Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 6th May 2008 15:53 UTC
Apple "Today, I'm incredibly pleased to introduce iMac, our consumer product. And iMac comes from the marriage of the excitement of the internet, with the simplicity of the Macintosh." With these words, ten years ago today, Steve Jobs unveiled the product that would literally save Apple from certain doom. The all-in-one, translucent computer would become a revolutionary product.
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RE: iMac (hard drives)
by Macrat on Tue 6th May 2008 17:37 UTC in reply to "iMac"
Macrat
Member since:
2006-03-27

If you want hard drive performance, you should have firewire enclosures. USB is dog slow for data transfers. Even firewire 400 is faster than the "theoretical" USB 480. The current iMacs have firewire 800.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: iMac (hard drives)
by Doc Pain on Tue 6th May 2008 23:14 in reply to "RE: iMac (hard drives)"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

If you want hard drive performance, you should have firewire enclosures. USB is dog slow for data transfers. Even firewire 400 is faster than the "theoretical" USB 480. The current iMacs have firewire 800.


Initially, USB seemed to be a port for plugging in input devices, such as keyboards and mice. Allthough USB uses polling instead of interrupts to act on hardware events, it's completely fine for this purpose. Furthermore, it enabled PCs to do things that were common years ago on Macs, on Sun workstations and even on the Atari ST, i. e. plugging the mouse into the keyboard so you have only one cable to the central unit.

After hardware manufacturers found out that you can plug nearly everything into an USB port (cameras, scanners, even rocket launchers, I'm waiting for the USB power drill), many different implementations developed. Instead of using existing standards, hardware manufacturers decided to develop things on their own in order fo force the user to have exactly that OS installed what they were providing drivers for.

While USB 2.0 makes external hard disk access faster, it won't be my choice. As you mentioned, firewire is faster, and if it's about an external hard disk, a simple NAS enclosure is very welcome, it makes things easier.

USB has never been designed to serve as a high performance data transfer connection. You can, however, use it that way, but don't expect performance.

Just my 0,02 Euro. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: iMac (hard drives)
by hobgoblin on Wed 7th May 2008 18:36 in reply to "RE[2]: iMac (hard drives)"
hobgoblin Member since:
2005-07-06

from what i understand the usb port was supposed to be a replacement for the serial port, with a added hot swap capability.

firewire on the other hand started out as a replacement for scsi.

but as usb is centrally controlled and allow for star like connections, its much cheaper to implement then firewire.

firewire on the other hand is a chain, and each device must also hold a controller chip (iirc, you can in theory connect two firewire devices together and transfer data between them without a computer to control it. something usb only picked up with usb-on-the-go or usb-otg as its more often called) and as such becomes more expensive.

also, it means that any proper firewire device should really have two firewire ports. and trying to unplug a device in the middle of the chain can be a pain as it has to wait until all the others are done doing their thing.

all in all, it depends on how things are to be used.

Edited 2008-05-07 18:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2