Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 8th May 2008 21:32 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes There are quite a few operating systems which have moved beyond the simple hobby operating system stage, onto a more lasting plane of existence. AROS, ReactOS, SkyOS, Syllable, Haiku; they're no longer basement products, coded by a single programer - they are now projects in which a lot of people have invested time, and possibly money too. They won't go away any time soon. The last few days have seen news on three of these systems: ReactOS, SkyOS, and Syllable.
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Morin
Member since:
2005-12-31

> Ever since 2000 I've felt Microsoft was working against their customer
> base and trying too hard to woo programmers. In my opinion a
> programmer-oriented OS is just not what the masses at home want.

Funny, because I thought the opposite on both points. I got the impression that MS did not actually serve the programmer by keeping the old Win32 API alive too long, except for making old programs still work without too much effort.

Also, making life easier for programmers seems an easy way to ensure high-quality applications to be created for that platform, and thus serve the end user (although he/she certainly isn't interested in those details).

Reply Parent Score: 2

elektrik Member since:
2006-04-18

Also, making life easier for programmers seems an easy way to ensure high-quality applications to be created for that platform, and thus serve the end user (although he/she certainly isn't interested in those details).


I can say, as a test engineer, that making life easier for programmers is *not* going to ensure that a "high-quality" application will be created...

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morin Member since:
2005-12-31

> I can say, as a test engineer, that making life easier for programmers is
> *not* going to ensure that a "high-quality" application will be created...

Then I'd be interested in your experience, because that's exactly what I am currently working at: tools to make life easier for programmers. Especially, I'd be interested to hear whether such tools are (by your experience) meaningless, "not enough", or even counter-productive to high-quality software, and why.

Reply Parent Score: 2