Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 21st May 2008 00:09 UTC, submitted by RJop
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless OpenMoko, the project that creates not only a Linux operating system for phones but the hardware to run it as well, has announced some major changes to its software stack. Traditionally a Gtk+ endeavour, this is all going to change rather drastically.
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Where now for Gnome Mobile?
by tristan on Wed 21st May 2008 00:40 UTC
tristan
Member since:
2006-02-01

Well, that's a real kick in the teeth for GTK.

I wonder: with the OLPC going to the "dark side", Maemo almost certainly switching to Qt (since Nokia have bought Trolltech), and now this, have we seen the end of the "Gnome Mobile" endeavour?

Reply Score: 7

RE: Where now for Gnome Mobile?
by leos on Wed 21st May 2008 01:04 in reply to "Where now for Gnome Mobile?"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

I wonder: with the OLPC going to the "dark side", Maemo almost certainly switching to Qt (since Nokia have bought Trolltech)


I dunno if that's the case. They've certainly said that they won't be switching to Qt on Maemo. Just making Qt more well supported there. I don't think anyone particularly feels like rewriting the existing GTK code.

and now this, have we seen the end of the "Gnome Mobile" endeavour?


Probably not. GTK has its advantages (the license for example). But when it comes to getting stuff done, it seems the openmoko people have decided that Qt is the better way to go. Of course if the community pours a lot of effort into bringing the GTK apps up to snuff then that could change.

I thought it was funny that in that thread, one of the responses was from someone that was so fundamentally opposed to C++ (claiming it is completely unusable) that he immediately rejected the whole openmoko project based on this switch. I can't see how anyone with such a closed, unyielding mind can call themselves a developer.

Reply Parent Score: 8

qt dark site, whahahaa
by cies on Wed 21st May 2008 01:31 in reply to "RE: Where now for Gnome Mobile?"
cies Member since:
2005-11-28

> darkside

hahahahaa! qt is not dark, it's opensource, run by a really nice group of _people_ that have been very supportive to the freesoftware movement. you make it sound like it is microsoft. shame on what ever being that calls a useful gpl code producing entity 'darkside'.

i think qt is a good thing for opensource, and opensource mobile, it's a pity it didn't became the standard in the first place.

> GTK has its advantages (the license for example).

i dont see any underlaying advantages. if you want to write a freesoftware app with qt its cool and free. if you want to write a commercial app you pay a little (yes it is not much taking in to regard what the developer cost are for a commercial app). with the money trolltech^H^H^H^H^Hnokia actually does something: they develop the most kickass cross platfrom toolkit available. i only see everyone benefit here.



i dont work for troll^H^H^H^Hnokia, i do code some kde app, i did try gtk and gnome development and based on experience with the two of then decided to develop my app on qt/kde as it develops a lot faster for me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

...one of the responses was from someone that was so fundamentally opposed to C++ (claiming it is completely unusable) that he immediately rejected the whole openmoko project based on this switch. I can't see how anyone with such a closed, unyielding mind can call themselves a developer.

This is quite common, sadly. When VLC switched to Qt for their main interface because of the cross-platform benefits (right-to-left languages for one) and because VLC is a real cross-platform open source application, the usual objections of licensing (VLC is still GPLed anyway) and the use of C++ were wheeled out.

People totally misunderstand C++, and have misunderstood a lot of comments people like Linus Torvalds have made about it. There's nothing wrong with C++ itself, but as an object-oriented language you inevitably find yourself using a library like Boost or the STL. This is where pretty much all the problems come from.

Reply Parent Score: 5