Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd May 2008 13:02 UTC
Multimedia, AV Many of us grew up with the idea of the component audio system. A receiver (or a separate preamplifier and amplifier), tuner (radio), record player, tape deck, and later on a CD player. If you were into more fancy stuff, you had a DAT or MiniDisc deck as well. While some of us cling on to this mindset like there's no tomorrow, the real world seems to favour a different method of consuming music. According to Erica Ogg (what's in a name), the component audio system is on its way out - thanks to the iPod and the commoditisation of music.
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Today's Recordings
by tech10171968 on Mon 26th May 2008 01:25 UTC
tech10171968
Member since:
2007-05-22

I keep hearing from audiophiles about more modern mediums losing headroom or "space", but I sometimes wonder if the fault doesn't really lie with the recording industry. Over the years I've seen a lot of albums being recorded at ridiculously high compression levels because, somehow, music execs keep thinking "louder=stands out on the radio=more sales". The problem with this well-documented issue is that the sonic "ceiling" keeps getting lower and lower, which means that the music doesn't really have a chance to "breathe". I would imagine then that, if the source itself is crap, no amount of vinyl pressings is going to make up for that. In all fairness, most sound engineers I know would consider today's high-compression trend to be an abomination but, since their arms are being twisted by those same music execs, they have no choice but to do the devil's bidding.

Edited 2008-05-26 01:26 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Today's Recordings
by sbergman27 on Mon 26th May 2008 01:55 in reply to "Today's Recordings"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Over the years I've seen a lot of albums being recorded at ridiculously high compression levels because, somehow, music execs keep thinking "louder=stands out on the radio=more sales".

Are you speaking of classical and/or symphonic sound tracks? Or do people really spend thousands of dollars on audio equipment to listen to Celine Dion?

Tell me it ain't so! ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Today's Recordings
by AdamW on Mon 26th May 2008 03:50 in reply to "RE: Today's Recordings"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

It's a continuum, not a dichotomy like that. It affects bands like, say, the Smashing Pumpkins. Take Gish and Siamese Dream, then take Machina. Aside from the fact that Machina's not a terribly good record, it's also hideously mastered; compressed up the wazoo. Apart from the fact that Gish and Siamese Dream are great records, they're also very carefully recorded and mastered, and have great dynamic range. There's lots of bands who are sufficiently 'commercial' or 'rock' to have fallen victim to the compression craze, but who are also good enough to benefit from good listening equipment.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Today's Recordings
by StephenBeDoper on Mon 26th May 2008 04:17 in reply to "Today's Recordings"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I've noticed that even within the discography of individual bands. CDs from the late 80s / early 90s are noticeably more quiet than stuff released in the last 10 years or so.

Reply Parent Score: 2