Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th May 2008 14:49 UTC
Windows We have learnt quite a lot about Windows 7 this week, and one of the things was that Windows 7 would not get a new kernel. The call for a new kernel has been made a few times on the internet, but anyone with a bit more insight into Windows' kernel knows that there is absolutely no need to write a new kernel for Windows - the problems with Windows lie in userland, not kernelland. While the authenticity of the Shipping Seven blog is not undisputed, the blogger makes some very excellent points regarding the kernel matter.
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RE[2]: Comment by FunkyELF
by UltraZelda64 on Fri 30th May 2008 16:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by FunkyELF"
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

"BSOD? What's that? Never seen one with Vista. In fact, I think I saw one in 5 years of working with dozens of XP systems."

Lucky (or is that "lying"?) bastard. I saw a BSOD just recently in XP, on a brand-new Dell laptop that came *with* it. And aside from that, the number of BSODs I've seen in XP over the years on various systems is uncountable; there have just been too many. Vista? Don't know, I don't own a computer with Vista, and if I did, it would be wiped immediately for a distro of Linux, and maybe a WinXP dual boot configuration.

"As for the "some crap is not responding" - would you prefer the OS terminate applications and lose your data without confirmation? I think I'd rather have depleted battery."

Either way, dead battery or the "not responding" message, there's a chance you'll get data loss. Also, in my own experience, I've noticed that these "non-responding" programs at shutdown time have absolutely nothing to do with what I was doing, and just killing them would have caused no data loss in any cases that I can recall. Besides... you would think that when telling a computer to shut down, you would have made sure that anything important has been saved to disk... right?

Reply Parent Score: -5

RE[3]: Comment by FunkyELF
by brandonlive on Sat 31st May 2008 17:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by FunkyELF"
brandonlive Member since:
2008-05-31

And aside from that, the number of BSODs I've seen in XP over the years on various systems is uncountable; there have just been too many. Vista? Don't know, I don't own a computer with Vista, and if I did, it would be wiped immediately for a distro of Linux, and maybe a WinXP dual boot configuration.


So you've never used Vista, and never will, but you hate it?

Either way, dead battery or the "not responding" message, there's a chance you'll get data loss. Also, in my own experience, I've noticed that these "non-responding" programs at shutdown time have absolutely nothing to do with what I was doing, and just killing them would have caused no data loss in any cases that I can recall. Besides... you would think that when telling a computer to shut down, you would have made sure that anything important has been saved to disk... right?


Well that's simply not true. If you shutdown and apps or services are not responding, Windows shows the dimmed screen with the list of processes preventing it from shutting down. If you don't answer, it will eventually just shutdown. Then again, I haven't actually seen this screen since the beta, so I'm rather skeptical about it being a common occurrence.

Besides, even if it's stuck and you close the laptop, it will go to sleep. XP may have had some problems with that (mainly due to crapping add-on software from IHVs for docking and such), but Vista doesn't.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by FunkyELF
by netpython on Sat 31st May 2008 17:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by FunkyELF"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

I have used Vista for two hours on my new laptop. Finally I wiped the harddisk and installed Ubuntu.

Though i have used microsoft products since 3.11 for workgroups. Perhaps Vista is a different breed but XP included, stopping an application or a hung process isn't as direct and straight forward as it is on on Unix.

It would be nice if from the cli you could "ps -waux | grep <process/app>" and kill -9.

On linux,freebsd,.. i never witnessed a hung cdrom choking the whole system.

Reply Parent Score: 0