Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 8th Jun 2008 15:53 UTC, submitted by sonic2000gr
Legal The story of Hans Reiser, the eccentric file system programmer, is a tragic one. The author of the ReiserFS was arrested under suspicion of the murder of his wife Nina Reiser in 2006, and was declared guilty in April 2008. Some still placed doubts about the conviction, stating that he might be innocent. It now seems that all doubt has been quelled, since Alameda County District Attorney Thomas Orloff has revealed that Hans Reiser will disclose the location of Nina's body for a reduced sentence.
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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

The story of Nina Reiser, slain wife of eccentric file system programmer Hans Reiser, is a tragic one.


I used "tragic" in a different manner than is usually the case in English. I'm referring to the Aristotle definition of tragedy, explained in his work Poetics. It basically comes to a play with a sad ending, but the key element is that the sad thing that happens to the main character is something that arises from his or her OWN imperfections - not through someone else's nor by his or her environment. Like Hans Reiser.

By this classical definition, the story of Nina Reiser is, in fact, not exactly Aristotelean tragedy.

Now, I probably pushed it a little too far for a general audience by being so technical, but hey, I got to put my Latin/Greek education to use somewhere. Didn't spend all those useless hours studying for nothing.

Reply Parent Score: 3

psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

Now, I probably pushed it a little too far for a general audience by being so technical, but hey, I got to put my Latin/Greek education to use somewhere. Didn't spend all those useless hours studying for nothing.


Not at all, in fact there are many scientists (and geeks) around (at least at my faculty) with a classical education and it hasn't proven useless either, since it has allowed me to pick up on other languages much faster than without that education.

My final year Greek subject was Sophocles' Antigone, so I know exactly what you mean (cf. the fall of Creon). I didn't take Latin for more than 3 years though, because my course schedule was already full enough with language and science subjects evenly balanced and some economics thrown into the mix.

Reply Parent Score: 2