Linked by Adam S on Wed 18th Jun 2008 23:05 UTC
Humor You'd think this headline was a joke, but sadly, it's not. It's the real headline of an article posted on SeattlePI.com in the blogs section. The core of the story is that a man couldn't get his printer to work with Windows Vista, and ultimately, with the help of a Microsoft test manager, solved the problem warranting a follow-up article. The comedy here, of course, is in reading what went wrong and wrapping your brain around why engineers didn't forsee such a thing happening.
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bert64
Member since:
2007-04-23

Having drivers on the device wouldn't help this guy, since his printer would never have had vista drivers on it in the first place.

On the other hand, Cups has the right idea... The print server has drivers, it accepts postscript data over the network, converts it to whatever the printer needs and prints it.
So how about a cups compatible print server built right in? Then you could plug the printer in to the network and have it work out of the box without requiring any drivers.
My printer at home does that, as do the printers at work, i can move between the two seamlessly and have never bothered installing any drivers on my laptop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

So how about a cups compatible print server built right in? Then you could plug the printer in to the network and have it work out of the box without requiring any drivers.


This almost works, but not quite.

HOWTO MAKE A POSTSCRIPT NETWORK PRINTER OUT OF AN INEXPENSIVE USB INKJET

The easiest way is to get hold of a cheap HP inkjet printer and an old laptop ... even one where the screen is dead will do, but make sure it has an ethernet port and a USB port.

Install Linux, samba, VNC and CUPS from a liveCD on to the laptop (use another monitor temporarily if the laptop screen is broken), plug the HP printer into the USB port, setup the printer in CUPs, and enable the machine as a samba server and a VNC server, and leave the laptop running.

Connect the laptop via ethernet to your LAN, and on any connected Windows machine you should now be able to print postscript to the CUPs printer.

The only caveat ... can you believe that Windows does not even have a generic Postscript printer driver?

You will still have to install a third-party generic postscript printer driver on any Windows client machines (Linux is fine, and Macs should be also).

Get a suitable Windows driver from here:
http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/product.jsp?product=44&platf...

Reply Parent Score: 4

renhoek Member since:
2007-04-29

sorry, but windows comes with a lot of postscript drivers. pick any driver which has ps or postscript in it's name.

don't bitch about windows postscript support that was the easiest thing to get working. what a lot harder is is to tell windows the printer has only A4 and not letter. every app seems to go back to the default setting and now i simply print everything in letter format, it's close enough to A4 to be usable.

Reply Parent Score: 1