Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jun 2008 20:28 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Java Back in May 2006, Sun announced during the JavaOne conference it would release Java as open source, licensed as GPL software. While it was released as GPL, it still contained about 5 percent proprietary, non-free code - the Java trap, as the FSF calls it. The FSF called to dismantle this trap, and now the IcedTea project has reached an important milestone.
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Where's Sun?
by segedunum on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:01 UTC
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

What I'd like to know is, where is Sun in all of this? It's nice that Red Hat and others have stepped forward with IcedTea to get towards a completely free implementation with OpenJDK, but why haven't Sun done that already? It's been over two years, and there hasn't been a peep out of Sun about getting the JDK (and the code) they produce as a completely open sourced and free implementation.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Where's Sun?
by KermitTheFragger on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:14 in reply to "Where's Sun?"
KermitTheFragger Member since:
2008-06-12

http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=...

Because Redhat was already working on it ? :-)

With Sun contributing 95% of the code I think we can safely say they've lived up to their part of the bargain.

Meanwhile Sun seems to be busy with JDK 7:

http://hg.openjdk.java.net/

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Where's Sun?
by segedunum on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:21 in reply to "RE: Where's Sun?"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Because Redhat was already working on it ? :-)

Red Hat was already working on Harmony and Classpath. So what?

With Sun contributing 95% of the code I think we can safely say they've lived up to their part of the bargain.

So Sun were committed to open sourcing 95% of Java at the time, but not the full 100% as they had implied? That's all you had to say.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Where's Sun?
by binarycrusader on Thu 19th Jun 2008 23:40 in reply to "Where's Sun?"
binarycrusader Member since:
2005-07-06

What I'd like to know is, where is Sun in all of this? It's nice that Red Hat and others have stepped forward with IcedTea to get towards a completely free implementation with OpenJDK, but why haven't Sun done that already? It's been over two years, and there hasn't been a peep out of Sun about getting the JDK (and the code) they produce as a completely open sourced and free implementation.


Where is Sun in all this? Oh, I don't know, actively working with the community to resolve these issues?

Let's not forget that they contributed 95% of the code here...

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Where's Sun?
by Phobos on Fri 20th Jun 2008 02:38 in reply to "Where's Sun?"
Phobos Member since:
2008-04-30

From the post:

"Working with Sun Microsystems and the broader Open Source Java community; Red Hat’s OpenJDK team included Tom Fitzsimmons, Lillian Angel, Gary Benson, Keith Seitz, Mark Wielaard and Andrew Haley."

So, yes... they worked with Sun on this, that's where Sun was.

Reply Parent Score: 5

trembovetski Member since:
2006-09-30

.. source.

Of the 4-5% of remaining closed parts (Java sound, java.color.* classes, font and antialised shape rasterizer being the major pieces) Sun actually contributed the majority - color, font and AA shape rasterizer.

It would be nice if it was recognized a bit more in TFA.

Dmitri
Java2D Team

Reply Parent Score: 14

evangs Member since:
2005-07-07

I hate the fact that I can't mod you up after posting. Kudos to you and your team for working hard on open sourcing the Swing related stuff.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Where's Sun?
by robilad on Sun 22nd Jun 2008 16:16 in reply to "Where's Sun?"
robilad Member since:
2006-01-02

Sun's been happily contributing all the time to OpenJDK.

I'd suggest following the respective mailing lists of the OpenJDK project if you are really interested in weighing contributions in the OpenJDK community by their employers. Suffice to say that developers employed at Sun have been very active at removing the remaining encumbrances over the past year, as have developers employed by Red Hat or other companies.

It's how community efforts work: you work together on shared goals. Sun is working closely with others on OpenJDK, which is why it only took a couple of months after the inception of OpenJDK6 this year for a distribution to have its own build pass the compatibility test suite.

Reply Parent Score: 2