Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jun 2008 20:28 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Java Back in May 2006, Sun announced during the JavaOne conference it would release Java as open source, licensed as GPL software. While it was released as GPL, it still contained about 5 percent proprietary, non-free code - the Java trap, as the FSF calls it. The FSF called to dismantle this trap, and now the IcedTea project has reached an important milestone.
Thread beginning with comment 319257
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Where's Sun?
by segedunum on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Where's Sun?"
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

Because Redhat was already working on it ? :-)

Red Hat was already working on Harmony and Classpath. So what?

With Sun contributing 95% of the code I think we can safely say they've lived up to their part of the bargain.

So Sun were committed to open sourcing 95% of Java at the time, but not the full 100% as they had implied? That's all you had to say.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Where's Sun?
by kaiwai on Thu 19th Jun 2008 23:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Where's Sun?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

So Sun were committed to open sourcing 95% of Java at the time, but not the full 100% as they had implied? That's all you had to say.


If Sun could have, they would have opensourced all 100% of it; the simply fact of the matter, in this place I like to called reality, it isn't that simple. Sun gave 95% of the source code of Java, because they owned 95% (or were able to arrange the opening of a certain amount) of the code - and that is all they are entitled to opening up.

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[3]: Where's Sun?
by binarycrusader on Thu 19th Jun 2008 23:42 in reply to "RE[2]: Where's Sun?"
binarycrusader Member since:
2005-07-06

"Because Redhat was already working on it ? :-)

Red Hat was already working on Harmony and Classpath. So what?

With Sun contributing 95% of the code I think we can safely say they've lived up to their part of the bargain.

So Sun were committed to open sourcing 95% of Java at the time, but not the full 100% as they had implied? That's all you had to say.
"

Sun didn't own the last 5%. It wasn't theirs to open. They were committed to opening as much as the had the legal right to do so. Many parts of that 5% were not available under any other terms.

Reply Parent Score: 5