Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Jun 2008 04:58 UTC, submitted by google_ninja
Windows We already know some of the directions Windows 7 will be exploring: a system-wide multitouch user interface framework, a focus on performance, all while building on top of the groundwork Windows Vista has laid out. While off-hand remarks have been made concerning the operating system's release date, it appears Microsoft now formalised the release date of Windows 7.
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RE: Lacking direction
by melkor on Wed 25th Jun 2008 10:32 UTC in reply to "Lacking direction"
melkor
Member since:
2006-12-16

A good operating system should not require you to use the command line. Period.

KDE isn't perfect, whilst I like KDE, it's UI can, and needs to be, improved upon.

It does seem fashionable to be a Microsoft basher these days.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Lacking direction
by mallard on Wed 25th Jun 2008 12:04 in reply to "RE: Lacking direction"
mallard Member since:
2006-01-06

A good operating system should not require you to use the command line. Period.


That's no excuse for having a poor command line. Just because you are not required to use it doesn't mean it shouldn't be there or that it shouldn't be useful.

Look at Mac OS X. No "normal" user need never touch the command line, but for those who want to there is a fully featured bash shell with useful apple-specific functionality.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Lacking direction
by Flatland_Spider on Wed 25th Jun 2008 13:41 in reply to "RE: Lacking direction"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

It does seem fashionable to be a Microsoft basher these days.


That's been fashionable for at least a decade. ;) Ah, the good old days of BeOS, OS2, Linux kernel 2.x, Win9x, NT 4, and others.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Lacking direction
by psychicist on Wed 25th Jun 2008 15:44 in reply to "RE: Lacking direction"
psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

Needing or not needing a command line doesn't have anything to do with being a good operating system or not. Free operating systems do away with the command line for general use, although I admit that its necessity for configuration purposes could be decreased even more, but work in that area is being done.

Most of what kaiwai has said consists of genuine criticism of the way Windows has been developing over the years from his point of view, although he could have uttered that more gently, but we all know that diplomacy isn't one of his strong points.

Your only reaction seems to be that he's bashing Windows, even though he had been using Vista for months before deciding enough was enough and going to Mac OS X and Solaris. Still he keeps his chances for future Windows usage open, what more do you want?

As far as I have seen from my limited exposure to pre-installed Windows Vista, it isn't that bad an operating system, but also nothing special. Considering the technical possibilities and limitations of the Windows computing paradigm, it doesn't look as bad as you can read in multiple places on the internet including OSNews.

Hardware manufacturers seem to have dropped the ball though with respect to having drivers available at or soon after its launch, a situation that is only now slightly improving. Seeing that Windows 7 builds upon this foundation, there could be some hope for its users that the problems that occurred going from Windows XP to Vista, won't happen this time.

The point about having developers issued older hardware with limited amounts of memory is particularly interesting to me and I agree completely.

I have access to multi-ghz, multicore systems with many gigabytes of memory, but have slower systems around (Pentium III 1 GHz, G4 400 MHz, UltraSPARC II 400 MHz and Loongson 2E 670 MHz) for development purposes and to test if the latest GNU/Linux operating system and associated free software run well enough on those compared to their performance on the greatest x86 hardware available to me.

Even if that is too much hassle for Microsoft in general and the Windows developers in particular, there are still projects such as the free (L)GPL'd QEMU and proprietary products that do the same thing (which are probably more palatable to the company for licensing reasons), in that they can virtualise or simulate a slower system on top of more modern hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Lacking direction
by bannor99 on Wed 25th Jun 2008 19:29 in reply to "RE: Lacking direction"
bannor99 Member since:
2005-09-15

A good operating system should not require you to use the command line. Period.


That's your opinion and you're entitled to it.
I not a great lover of the command line but there are
times ( and I'm referring to using Windows here )
when I prefer to use it because the dialog boxes / property sheets are so tedious that they are more hindrance than help.

If there is no reason for the command line then do away with it rather than implementing it shittily.

PERIOD.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Lacking direction
by kaiwai on Thu 26th Jun 2008 00:54 in reply to "RE: Lacking direction"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

A good operating system should not require you to use the command line. Period.


I never said that everything should be done via command line; I implicitly stated that I wantd the UI and command line to be equal in attention which Microsoft developers give it. How you lept from what I said, an improved command line, and then claiming I said everything should be done via command line - I can work out how you made basically you did a strawman - a misrepresentation of what I said.

I don't expect a reply. Its typical around here to 'comment' and 'run' rather than enter into some sort of conversation.

KDE isn't perfect, whilst I like KDE, it's UI can, and needs to be, improved upon.


Again, I never said it was perfect. You are replying to ME, address the issues *I* raised. If you want to create a whole new line of conversation, then create new thread.

It does seem fashionable to be a Microsoft basher these days.


And it seems fashionable for people like you to parade around claiming to be the 'impartial observer'. Who is bashing Microsoft?

I'm sorry, as soon as you use the words 'hater' and 'basher' and other pejoratives, you've lost the argument before you even have started. So please, don't even try to argue your case until you drop those immature and pathetically childish words which have the equivalence of "stop being so mean to me!"

Edited 2008-06-26 00:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Lacking direction
by melkor on Thu 26th Jun 2008 01:50 in reply to "RE[2]: Lacking direction"
melkor Member since:
2006-12-16

I only have to look at the large number of joyously happy posts in a variety of threads that seemingly bash Microsoft for the smallest of sins, but largely ignore Linux and BSDs many failings. Convenient? You bet.

I've been using Vista for a month now, and it's great. Whilst DOS isn't that great, it's not that bad either. It does the job, and does it well enough to be without any major issues. Sure, it could be redesigned, but is it worth it? For the small percentage of people who use it, for a small percentage of the time, is it worth it? I doubt it. 99.9999999% of Windows users use the GUI, and probably for 99.999999% of the time. There is far less of a need for Windows to drop to a command line than other operating systems.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 1