Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Mon 21st Jul 2008 22:38 UTC, submitted by Moulinneuf
Apple Software engineer Satoshi Nakajima, the lead architect of Microsoft's Windows 95, picked up a Mac for the first time two years ago. He was so impressed, he says he'll never again touch a PC again. Satoshi loves Apple products so much, he started a company in April, Big Canvas, to develop for Apple's iPhone platform full-time. "We have chosen iPhone as the platform to release our first product (for) several reasons," explains his company's website. "We love Apple products... You need love to be creative."
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RE: Interesting
by protagonist on Mon 21st Jul 2008 23:38 UTC in reply to "Interesting"
protagonist
Member since:
2005-07-06

I have found that most of the commercial programs I need to work with are considerably cheaper and more functional on my Mac than were the PC equivalents. And a lot of what I had to purchase for Windows came free with the Mac. But, to each his own. I know people who are happy with Vista as well.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Interesting
by kaiwai on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 00:37 in reply to "RE: Interesting"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I have found that most of the commercial programs I need to work with are considerably cheaper and more functional on my Mac than were the PC equivalents. And a lot of what I had to purchase for Windows came free with the Mac. But, to each his own. I know people who are happy with Vista as well.


I guess it is because Mac users tend (like me) to be more anal about whether the application not only accomplishes the task but actually is usable as well. Fulfilling a task isn't enough; the whole experience has to be top notch from the interface to the quality of the implementation.

The only other 'desktop environment' that comes close to that sort of anal retentiveness is GNOME where GTK+ based applications are routinely updated so that they conform to the GNOME HIG specifications.

On the Windows world, it appears, unfortunately, that very few developers seem to actually spend any time making sure their application is ascetically appealing but also usable at the same time. Far too much time these days seems to be spent on 'skinning' and making things look cool rather than making sure that end users are as productive as possible on a given environment.

Edited 2008-07-22 00:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Interesting
by pixel8r on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 03:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
pixel8r Member since:
2007-08-11

The only other 'desktop environment' that comes close to that sort of anal retentiveness is GNOME where GTK+ based applications are routinely updated so that they conform to the GNOME HIG specifications.


and this is the #1 reason why I (a long time KDE user) recently tried GNOME for getting some real work done and haven't logged back into KDE since. This is not to say that one is better than the other, but I found GNOME to be so much more elegant and a lot more "polished" and because of the level of polish in my distro towards things like OpenOffice etc, I found I was able to work more productively.

Not only that, but compiz works great in GNOME but still has many small issues in KDE (for me anyway) so I was able to fully utilize the eye candy as well, which is a huge plus for me. The whole system just feels so much more refined and stable.

offtopic i know - my apologies...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Interesting
by collinm on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 07:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
collinm Member since:
2005-07-15

there are a lot of ui problem in gnome...

toolbar size is not alway the same, icon size, icon bar....

google it if you want to know others

applications is poor if i compare with kde: k3b, konqueror, koffice, kopete, amarok

i think kde 4 is a lot better and easier to use

Reply Parent Score: 2