Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Mon 21st Jul 2008 22:38 UTC, submitted by Moulinneuf
Apple Software engineer Satoshi Nakajima, the lead architect of Microsoft's Windows 95, picked up a Mac for the first time two years ago. He was so impressed, he says he'll never again touch a PC again. Satoshi loves Apple products so much, he started a company in April, Big Canvas, to develop for Apple's iPhone platform full-time. "We have chosen iPhone as the platform to release our first product (for) several reasons," explains his company's website. "We love Apple products... You need love to be creative."
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RE[3]: Their first product...
by tyrione on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 00:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Their first product..."
tyrione
Member since:
2005-11-21

A BSOD is just a kernel panic and OS X can also have panics. They used to be a bit frightening:

http://www.osxbook.com/book/bonus/chapter5/panic/images/panic_1.jpg

but now look like this

http://www.leussler.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/osxker...


True, but Apple's kernel doesnt' produce those gloriously useless and cryptic registry addresses that reveal nothing about what the hell just puked.

Linux and OS X are truly missing out on that one.

Reply Parent Score: 5

thavith_osn Member since:
2005-07-11

True, but Apple's kernel doesnt' produce those gloriously useless and cryptic registry addresses that reveal nothing about what the hell just puked.

I write file system drivers for Windows. When the machine blue screens (which is very common sadly (due to my great programming skills - lol)) it gives me a detailed report of what just happened. You just have to know how to read it. It has saved me hours of debugging.

The Mac's SOD is nicer than the BSOD, but no more enlightening. It doesn't tell you why your machine just "puked", only that it did and how to restart it. There is a dump that you can look at however (just like Win and Lin), but again, you have to know how to read it...

I've not seen the Linux SOD for a while (I hardly run Linux sadly), so can't comment on the amount of detail there...

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Their first product...
by tyrione on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 01:34 in reply to "RE[4]: Their first product..."
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

True, but Apple's kernel doesnt' produce those gloriously useless and cryptic registry addresses that reveal nothing about what the hell just puked.

I write file system drivers for Windows. When the machine blue screens (which is very common sadly (due to my great programming skills - lol)) it gives me a detailed report of what just happened. You just have to know how to read it. It has saved me hours of debugging.

The Mac's SOD is nicer than the BSOD, but no more enlightening. It doesn't tell you why your machine just "puked", only that it did and how to restart it. There is a dump that you can look at however (just like Win and Lin), but again, you have to know how to read it...

I've not seen the Linux SOD for a while (I hardly run Linux sadly), so can't comment on the amount of detail there...


In writing filesystems you also have access to the debug code, tracers and more to help give feedback, besides the reference manual to describe each error in detail.

The average mortal doesn't have access to this and to them it's garbage. The more revealing and discernible the error messages are inherently speaks volumes to filesystem developers who take that into consideration.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

here is a kernel oops for you:

http://fopref.meinungsverstaerker.de/div/oops.png

(this one didn't lead to a kernel crash)


you see the information there ... complete backtrace.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Their first product...
by merlimat on Tue 22nd Jul 2008 11:31 in reply to "RE[4]: Their first product..."
merlimat Member since:
2008-07-22

In Mac OS X after a reboot forced by a kernel panic, you will find the stack trace dumped in a file.

Additionally, in MacOS X you can put the kernel in debug mode. This means that, in case of a kernel panic, you can have the dump of the entire kernel memory sent to another machine and analyze it with gdb.

Reply Parent Score: 1

stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

True, but Apple's kernel doesnt' produce those gloriously useless and cryptic registry addresses that reveal nothing about what the hell just puked.

Linux and OS X are truly missing out on that one.


Back in about 2000 the BSOD helped me realise that my audio driver was causing crashes. (which i would never have thought seeing as the driver came from the cd.)

download new driver and install, no more crashes. you just have to know what you're looking for. i've used it for a long time and you tend to pick things up as you go.

Edited 2008-07-22 02:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2