Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Jul 2008 22:04 UTC
Windows As someone who uses Windows Vista practically daily, I've always wondered where all the negativity in the media comes from. Sure, Vista isn't perfect (as if any operating system is), but I just don't see where all the complaints are coming from. It runs just fine on my old (6 years) machine, all my software and hardware is compatible, and it's stable as a rock. Microsoft has been wondering the same thing, and after a little test, they may have found out why people seem to dislike Vista so much.
Thread beginning with comment 324417
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
It's a marketing problem
by japh on Thu 24th Jul 2008 22:24 UTC
japh
Member since:
2005-11-11

My guess is that one of the reasons "Mojave" got positive feedback was that no one promised the users it would "revolutionize the way you work with computers".

They probably also didn't get to see this first:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9ifQvQCO7Y to get their hopes up.

And finally, they probably didn't have to wait for a few years before getting to try it out.

Vista isn't bad, and in my opinion it's probably the best from Microsoft so far, but you're not going to make people happy with something good (a few years late) if you promised them something wonderful.

Microsoft's biggest problem with Vista is their own marketing who managed to make people upset with something that actually isn't bad.

Reply Score: 10

RE: It's a marketing problem
by Laurence on Thu 24th Jul 2008 22:42 in reply to "It's a marketing problem"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

My guess is that one of the reasons "Mojave" got positive feedback was that no one promised the users it would "revolutionize the way you work with computers".


Or it might be because Microsoft controlled the experiment. Users weren't shown the daily complaints about Vista but instead were fast-tracked to the eye candy et al.

Like when I show Linux off to my mates - I don't go "look at me load a Windows wifi driver through the command line" but instead i show them Compiz-Fusion with applications popping out of a rotating cube and windows wobbling as I drag them from one side of the screen to another.

Reply Parent Score: 23

RE: It's a marketing problem
by CrazyDude1 on Thu 24th Jul 2008 23:47 in reply to "It's a marketing problem"
CrazyDude1 Member since:
2007-09-17

IMHO Vista sucked but Vista SP1 is far better. It is not still as stable as XP SP2 but it is much better. I have only had explorer hang on me twice in 2-3 months and outlook hang once. On XP, they never hung in 2-3 years.

I was the one who was forced by my employer to upgrade and as a developer I was really skeptical. But now that I have used vista for few months, I don't think I would go back. The whole experience of Vista is better and the code is much more readable on Vista due to better fonts + rendering.

Edit: Btw one tool without which I wouldn't have liked vista is "vistaglazz". This allowed me to keep transparency enabled when applications are maximized since I always keep my apps maximized and I hated the black border original vista does. Maximized apps are one reason I never liked OSX. Why force these choices on user, I never understand.

Edited 2008-07-24 23:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

You're making compromises to use an OS that actually costs money to buy.

"It's not so bad-- For my $200 I only get two or three crashes a week. Compared to the OS I'd already paid for, it's not terrible..."

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: It's a marketing problem
by google_ninja on Fri 25th Jul 2008 00:52 in reply to "It's a marketing problem"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

My guess is that one of the reasons "Mojave" got positive feedback was that no one promised the users it would "revolutionize the way you work with computers".


Who doesn't do that though? Apple's ad campeigns are made to make you feel smarter and cooler then your neighbours, hell, firefox 3 claims to give you a whole new internet.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: It's a marketing problem
by dreamlax on Fri 25th Jul 2008 08:26 in reply to "RE: It's a marketing problem"
dreamlax Member since:
2007-01-04

General rules of thumb:

The word "then" is always related to time.

"It happened then."
"Back then, things were better quality."

The word "than" is always related to comparisons.

"It was better than yesterday."
"Back then, things were better quality than they are today."

Edited 2008-07-25 08:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

google_ninja said...

Who doesn't do that though? Apple's ad campeigns are made to make you feel smarter and cooler then your neighbours, hell, firefox 3 claims to give you a whole new internet.


I was with you until you brought in Firefox....

Go ahead and download the latest Firefox. Install it and head over to addons.mozilla.org and install the following extensions:

Adblock Plus
Adblock Element Hider
No Squint
Stylish

OPTIONAL:

No Script
CustomizeGoogle
BugMeNot

After you get all that done, and selected a few basic lists for adblock Plus to use, hit up userstyles.org for some of your favorite sites to see how different they can be!

If that isn't a whole new internet, I don't know what is!

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: It's a marketing problem
by Clinton on Sat 26th Jul 2008 01:29 in reply to "It's a marketing problem"
Clinton Member since:
2005-07-05

My guess is that one of the reasons "Mojave" got positive feedback was that no one promised the users it would "revolutionize the way you work with computers".


I agree with you.

I think Microsoft really shot themselves in the foot with Vista. Probably 20% of the things people hate about Vista are technological and 80% were caused by marketing. However, that 20% is stuff that stares you in the face on a daily basis.

I know this is a small thing, but the thing that pisses me off most about Vista whenever I have to use it is the sidebar disappears when you click the "Show Desktop" button in the Start bar. The Sidebar should be part of the desktop and be there when you show the desktop. The current functionality is just wrong. Maybe you can configure it somewhere, but this is the default behavior and I don't use Windows enough to want to learn how to tweak it.

There are a lot of other things like that too. Vista is a decent OS, but there's just a lot of stuff that was poorly thought out from a usability standpoint, I think.

Reply Parent Score: 2