Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 00:16 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "The recent release of Intel's Centrino 2 platform means a refresh of notebooks from every manufacturer. Lenovo took this chance to not only update the internals of their ThinkPads, but also to make changes to their naming conventions and release a few new models, including the addition of the ThinkPad X200 to the venerable X series." The X200 brings along a widescreen display (the X was the ThinkPad's last standard aspect ratio series), the Centrino 2 platform with 45nm processor, and an SSD option. The notebook is a bit wider than before but still has that ThinkPad keyboard and with the right battery it will last up to 9 hours."
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Still Linux-friendly?
by tech10171968 on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 03:17 UTC
tech10171968
Member since:
2007-05-22

I remember lusting for a Thinkpad a few years back (when they were still made by IBM); that was because they were highly regarded in my LUG as one of the most Linux-friendly notebooks on the market.

Fast forward a few years later and, now that I'm finally making enough money to afford one, I find that they're made by another company, though still highly regarded.

I guess my question is, are the hardware components which make up the Lenovo-era Thinkpads still as Linux-friendly as they were back then? If so then I may have to look into getting one.

Edited 2008-08-03 03:18 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Still Linux-friendly?
by kaiwai on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 03:41 in reply to "Still Linux-friendly?"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I remember lusting for a Thinkpad a few years back (when they were still made by IBM); that was because they were highly regarded in my LUG as one of the most Linux-friendly notebooks on the market.

Fast forward a few years later and, now that I'm finally making enough money to afford one, I find that they're made by another company, though still highly regarded.

I guess my question is, are the hardware components which make up the Lenovo-era Thinkpads still as Linux-friendly as they were back then? If so then I may have to look into getting one.


The T series are Linux friendly, but I have heard some compatibility problems with Linux with the X series given that it relies on an external CD/DVD drive and some non-standard components - thats based off the feedback I've seen with the x61 series, but things might have changed with the x200.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by mksoft on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 07:14 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
mksoft Member since:
2006-02-25

I have a X60s, no special problems useing several distros, ArchLinux being the current). For ThinkPad related questions (not just Linux) the best source is ThinkWiki:
http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/ThinkWiki

Edited 2008-08-03 07:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Still Linux-friendly?
by HappyGod on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 04:58 in reply to "Still Linux-friendly?"
HappyGod Member since:
2005-10-19

Lusting after a Thinkpad? That must be the first time I've ever heard that! :-)

To me Thinkpads are the laptop equivalent of white goods. Competent, reliable, but mind numbingly boring.

Seriously though the design dept. of Lenovo/IBM really have been out to lunch for a few years, kind of like Porsche with their 911's I suppose.

Come on Lenovo, hire a design guy!

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by byrc on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 06:46 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
byrc Member since:
2006-02-18

I think the thinkpad design is great. Solid, minimalistic and classy.

I guess design is subjective, but I do not understand where people fault the thinkpad design. One of the reasons I purchased a thinkpad was the aesthetics of the machine.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by mksoft on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 07:23 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
mksoft Member since:
2006-02-25

Come on Lenovo, hire a design guy!


Please don't change a thing. I love the design of ThinkPads, form and function. Guess I'm not much of a "Oooh, it's shiny..." or "Hey, look at me" crowd and prefer a solid design.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by boudewijn on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 12:04 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

Oh, yes -- I always wanted a thinkpad myself, too, but had, for some time, to make do with dell, acers, gateways and similar. Nowadays, not only have I got a nice X61t for myself (works perfectly with OpenSUSE 11), but I've got or am getting thinkpads for my wife and daughters. Great design, great keyboard, great compatibility, great durability.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by Kokopelli on Sun 3rd Aug 2008 14:01 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
Kokopelli Member since:
2005-07-06

Lenovo have a "design guy," quite a few of them in fact. The Thinkpad line is very unlikely to change in appearance and function in the next few years. The design is proven, and more importantly iconic.

If you want a "different" design from Lenovo look to the ideapads.

Reply Parent Score: 2

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

To me Thinkpads are the laptop equivalent of white goods. Competent, reliable, but mind numbingly boring.


The Thinkpad's design puts function first, aesthetics are a purely secondary concern - which is one of the main reasons that many people (myself included) prefer Thinkpads. With most other laptops I've used/supported, it seems that the designers focused on aesthetics to the detriment of function/usability.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Still Linux-friendly?
by zdzichu on Mon 4th Aug 2008 12:25 in reply to "RE: Still Linux-friendly?"
zdzichu Member since:
2006-11-07

Wanna more shiny design? Look at ThinkPads SL. Reflective cover and red LED mimicking Macs (pulsing when suspended).

Reply Parent Score: 1