Linked by David Adams on Mon 4th Aug 2008 18:56 UTC
Internet & Networking In technology environment, keeping things simple takes lot more effort and maturity than keeping it complex. These 10 items are guidelines more than rules, that I have learned over the years doing intensive work on the IT infrastructure. These guidelines are mostly common sense and can be helpful for anybody who administers an IT system, including Linux/Windows Administrator, Network Administrator and DBA.
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More
by hraq on Mon 4th Aug 2008 23:06 UTC
hraq
Member since:
2005-07-06

1. Know your limits: and never try things you have not worked on before and have no experience with. Call for help from more experienced administrators

2. Only implement and maintain what you have successfully tested and done for more than 10 times with 0 errors.

3. Write down what your customers and clients refuse to do from what you have suggested, so that you can show them in the future what they did to themselves.

4. Don't go with cheap hardware/software as its instability will affect your reputation.

5. Don't give too much details about what you have done to fix problems...those guys are buisy with their businesses and don't have enough pain to endure.

6. Don't undercharge: because next time they will ask if you can come and do it for free.

and many more

Reply Score: 2

RE: More
by PJBonoVox on Tue 5th Aug 2008 14:41 in reply to "More"
PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

This is easily the worse list I've ever read. I don't agree with a single point.

Well, except for not using cheap hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: More
by Vanders on Tue 5th Aug 2008 18:05 in reply to "More"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

1. Know your limits: and never try things you have not worked on before and have no experience with. Call for help from more experienced administrators

2. Only implement and maintain what you have successfully tested and done for more than 10 times with 0 errors.


So when your boss asks you to do something, your answer should be "No I won't do that, I don't know how? I don't think that'll work somehow.

A competent admin should be able to what's needed and do it well, even if they've never done it before.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: More
by Imp of the Perverse on Tue 5th Aug 2008 19:33 in reply to "More"
Imp of the Perverse Member since:
2008-07-27

1. Know your limits: and never try things you have not worked on before and have no experience with. Call for help from more experienced administrators


Then how do you learn anything new? I understand the rationale, but IMO it's better to take the attitude of "don't make promises / commitments until you know for certain that you can deliver on them."

2. Only implement and maintain what you have successfully tested and done for more than 10 times with 0 errors.


I think that only applies to a very narrow range of IT work - viz. jobs where your employers encourages & pays for regular training, or if you're working in a field that never changes.

5. Don't give too much details about what you have done to fix problems...those guys are buisy with their businesses and don't have enough pain to endure.


And in many cases, the client doesn't care / wouldn't understand the specific details anyway.

6. Don't undercharge: because next time they will ask if you can come and do it for free.


That's one of the things that soured me on volunteer work: dealing with people who were even more demanding and less grateful than most paying customers (that, and the folks who apparently got into volunteering as way to bolster an already-inflated sense of self-importance).

Reply Parent Score: 1