Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Fri 8th Aug 2008 13:14 UTC
Windows This week at the Black Hat Security Conference two security researchers will discuss their findings which could completely bring Windows Vista to its knees. According to Dino Dai Zovi, a popular security researcher, "the genius of this is that it's completely reusable. They have attacks that let them load chosen content to a chosen location with chosen permissions. That's completely game over."
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RE[3]: Bottom Line
by Windows Sucks on Fri 8th Aug 2008 23:21 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Bottom Line"
Windows Sucks
Member since:
2005-11-10

Exactly how is Windows (or NT) considered multi-user when all it takes is Power User permissions (maybe less) to be able to access anyone else's home folder on the PC?


ACL's in Windows are powerful but complicated and also not used often or proper.

Linux permissions are pretty straight forward and easy to use. Maybe not as encompassing as in Windows but pretty easy to figure out and use.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Bottom Line
by lemur2 on Sat 9th Aug 2008 07:04 in reply to "RE[3]: Bottom Line"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Exactly how is Windows (or NT) considered multi-user when all it takes is Power User permissions (maybe less) to be able to access anyone else's home folder on the PC?


ACL's in Windows are powerful but complicated and also not used often or proper.

Linux permissions are pretty straight forward and easy to use. Maybe not as encompassing as in Windows but pretty easy to figure out and use.
"

Basic Linux permissions are indeed simpler and not as encompassing as Windows permissions ... but you can very easily extend Linux beyond the basic security.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SELinux
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AppArmor

A number of popular Linux distributions now include these added levels of security. RedHat uses SELinux, and SuSe and Ubuntu include AppArmor.

The most important aspect here is however that userland applications in Linux are designed to be run at low levels of permissions.

Reply Parent Score: 3