Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Thu 21st Aug 2008 23:44 UTC
Linux "Where is Linux the most popular, and where are the different Linux distributions the most popular?". Pingdom has taken a stab at answering this question using the Google Insights for Search. Read on for our observations on the results.
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Comment by moleskine
by moleskine on Fri 22nd Aug 2008 10:46 UTC
moleskine
Member since:
2005-11-05

There are some acute comments below the article itself, pointing out that it's so hard to get accurate data that these results shouldn't really be seen as more than very broad brush. It's safe to say that more people use Linux in Cuba than they do on the Greenland ice shelf, but if you become too granular about what and where then the facts are increasingly dubious. In addition, the article only looks at Western-sourced distros. What about local ones of the Red Flag Linux kind? Knowing a bit more about them might help to explain the figures.

In a comment that caught my eye, one person suggested that part of Red Hat's success in some parts of the world may be down to their certification and qualification programs. In other words, in some countries folks see Red Hat as a way to get yourself a qualification and pull yourself up in the world. That is a very interesting and powerful idea, and a way for other distros like Ubuntu to give themselves an edge.

Plenty of ironies here, anyway. Utah's products are most popular among former commie countries. Red Hat is more popular outside the US than inside it. Ubuntu's stronghold appears to be in Italy and not anywhere in Africa. Debian is very popular in Cuba but I wonder how many Cubans Debian has on the roll as devs.

Edited 2008-08-22 10:46 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by moleskine
by asgard on Fri 22nd Aug 2008 11:59 in reply to "Comment by moleskine"
asgard Member since:
2008-06-07

Plenty of ironies here, anyway. Utah's products are most popular among former commie countries.


Actually, this is wrong. The OpenSUSE is probably popular in Europe (and in Czech Republic in particular) because SUSE was a German company, which hired a lot of talented developers (especially in the Linux kernel area) here in Czech Republic back in the 90s. So this has nothing to do with Novell, they just came and bought SUSE almost a decade later.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by moleskine
by moleskine on Fri 22nd Aug 2008 14:46 in reply to "RE: Comment by moleskine"
moleskine Member since:
2005-11-05

"Plenty of ironies here, anyway. Utah's products are most popular among former commie countries.


Actually, this is wrong. The OpenSUSE is probably popular in Europe (and in Czech Republic in particular) because SUSE was a German company, which hired a lot of talented developers (especially in the Linux kernel area) here in Czech Republic back in the 90s. So this has nothing to do with Novell, they just came and bought SUSE almost a decade later.
"

Er, but the whole point is that isn't what the maps show, thus leading one to question the basis of the data and the article. I know about SuSE. I used to use it precisely because it was an example of European excellence. That's only partly true today. Novell have had SuSE for a while now, too. They didn't buy it yesterday.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

France is number 5 on the list for Mandriva and it's a french distribution natively.

Reply Parent Score: 3

agrouf Member since:
2006-11-17

Contributors to Mandriva are:
90% Humans from all over the world
5% Brazilians
3% French
2% Rest of the world

Edited 2008-08-22 13:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by moleskine
by markjensen on Fri 22nd Aug 2008 13:42 in reply to "Comment by moleskine"
markjensen Member since:
2005-07-26

Plenty of ironies here, anyway. Utah's products are most popular among former commie countries.

Actually, the "Utah anomaly" could probably best be summed up in three letters:
S C O
;)

Reply Parent Score: 2