Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Sep 2008 16:46 UTC
Internet & Networking "In 2005, AT&T CEO Ed Whitacre famously told BusinessWeek, "What they [Google, Vonage, and others] would like to do is to use my pipes free. But I ain't going to let them do that... Why should they be allowed to use my pipes?" The story of how the Internet is structured economically is not so much a story about net neutrality, but rather it's a story about how ISPs actually do use AT&T's pipes for free, and about why AT&T actually wants them to do so. These inter-ISP sharing arrangements are known as 'peering' or 'transit', and they are the two mechanisms that underlie the interconnection of networks that form the Internet. In this article, I'll to take a look at the economics of peering of transit in order to give you a better sense of how traffic flows from point A to point B on the Internet, and how it does so mostly without problems, despite the fact that the Internet is a patchwork quilt of networks run by companies, schools, and governments."
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Comment by pinochet
by pinochet on Fri 5th Sep 2008 00:08 UTC
pinochet
Member since:
2008-09-05

What they [Google, Vonage, and others] would like to do is to use my pipes free. But I ain't going to let them do that... Why should they be allowed to use my pipes?"

Because ATT customers pay for Internet access, and those customers want content.

Also, a lot of the ATT infrastructure was helped along with public funds.

I think SPs that try and alienate Internet users by doing this should get de-linked. Problem solved. Other countries could really make an impact punishing clowns like this. Drop them off of BGP.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by pinochet
by zombie process on Fri 5th Sep 2008 13:21 in reply to "Comment by pinochet"
zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

Peering wars are a very, very slippery slope, especially when done for "payback." Generally it's not the transit provider who feels it at all, but more often the end-user.

Reply Parent Score: 2