Linked by David Adams on Sat 6th Sep 2008 14:34 UTC
Google Walter Mossberg of The Wall Street Journal, who has been testing Google's Chrome browser for a week next to the latest version of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, concludes "With the emergence of Chrome, consumers have a new and innovative browser choice, and with IE8, the new browser war is sure to be a worthy contest." Many cloud computing enthusiasts are overjoyed with Chrome and call it the first cloud browser or even the basis for a cloud operating system.
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Cloudy thinking
by alban on Sun 7th Sep 2008 00:24 UTC in reply to "god..."
alban
Member since:
2005-11-15

Cloudy thinking makes for nice fluffy little diagrams that an IT executive can understand. Sometimes things get so high level they become meaningless. Chrome is just a browser; google mail just stores my mail on some servers, there is no magic involved and drawing a cloud adds nothing useful to a conservation.
You can tell browsers are defective every day when you use them so they certainly need fixing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Cloudy thinking
by stestagg on Sun 7th Sep 2008 11:03 in reply to "Cloudy thinking"
stestagg Member since:
2006-06-03

It's not quite that simple. Take, for example, Google Mail. Yes, the emails are stored on a google server, but with gears, a copy can also be kept on the client machine, allowing offline access, Similarly, the whole Gmail 'application' can be automatically stored locally to allow offline use. This sort of thing makes synchronisation really easy, in a manner that is transparent to the user.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Cloudy thinking
by TemporalBeing on Mon 8th Sep 2008 17:10 in reply to "RE: Cloudy thinking"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

It's not quite that simple. Take, for example, Google Mail. Yes, the emails are stored on a google server, but with gears, a copy can also be kept on the client machine, allowing offline access, Similarly, the whole Gmail 'application' can be automatically stored locally to allow offline use. This sort of thing makes synchronisation really easy, in a manner that is transparent to the user.


So what's the difference between that an IMAP? Or even spoofing Pop3 as IMAP (e.g. not allowing the client to delete messages)?



Really, nothing is gained by it for e-mail.



On the other hand, Google Gears really helps Google with its Productivity Suite (e.g. Docs, Spreadsheet) since they can then be run in off-line mode. But it's not a big help for Gmail...

Reply Parent Score: 1