Linked by David Adams on Wed 10th Sep 2008 21:33 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems It this post Geek.com offers a walkthrough of the building of a powerful, yet affordable workstation. Each of the parts was carefully chosen and the build was extensively detailed. There were some problems, but those were worked around and the end result was an impressive 64-bit workhorse.
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RE: Inefficient use of capital
by poundsmack on Wed 10th Sep 2008 21:55 UTC in reply to "Inefficient use of capital"
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

the sad thing is most software and even OS's still arnt fully (or in some cases at all) able to utilize mutiple cores to their full extent. truely multi-threaded aplication development isn't in full swing yet. but its getting there so thats good.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Inefficient use of capital
by rajj on Wed 10th Sep 2008 22:08 in reply to "RE: Inefficient use of capital"
rajj Member since:
2005-07-06

A lot of tasks can't even be "parallalized" (crypto) or incur so much synchronization overhead that most of the benefit is lost --at least that's been my experience in my admittedly short dev career so far--, and it certainly didn't seem worth the pain.

Secondly, most desktop workloads aren't compute bound in the first place. You might see some benefit with 2 cores, but after that there just isn't anyway you'll have enough mutually independent tasks to keep them all busy --definitely not enough to warrant the expense.

This isn't to say that no problems benefit from threading, I just have trouble seeing it help significantly for desktop applications. Gaming and other 3d applications, that's a whole different story.

Reply Parent Score: 2

vermaden Member since:
2006-11-18

A lot of tasks can't even be "parallalized" (crypto) or incur so much synchronization overhead that most of the benefit is lost --at least that's been my experience in my admittedly short dev career so far--, and it certainly didn't seem worth the pain.


That depends on the application, TrueCrypt 6.0 uses all avialable cores for example:

from http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/?s=version-history:
"Parallelized encryption/decryption on multi-core processors (or multi-processor systems). Increase in encryption/decryption speed is directly proportional to the number of cores and/or processors."

Secondly, most desktop workloads aren't compute bound in the first place. You might see some benefit with 2 cores, but after that there just isn't anyway you'll have enough mutually independent tasks to keep them all busy --definitely not enough to warrant the expense.

Unless you use virtualization ...

Reply Parent Score: 2

wanker90210 Member since:
2007-10-26

I was a happy owner of an Abit bp6 mobos with the 2 x Celeron hack. Needless to say, in '99 multithreading was Star Trek. I remember ripping mp3:s on it and was annoyed that the encoder completely ignored the extra CPU.

So i made a script that started more than one encoder in parallel.

Edited 2008-09-10 22:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

helf Member since:
2005-07-06

yeah, I used to run a dual ppro-s 200 tower. I was in heaven ;) Right now my main computer is a dual PIII-600 Katmai with 1gb of PC100. Still plenty fast for my purposes. I'm planning on upgrading to at least quadcores in a few months.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I was a happy owner of an Abit bp6 mobos with the 2 x Celeron hack. Needless to say, in '99 multithreading was Star Trek....


I had that mobo (and still use it from time to time even now).

One of the best computers I've owned.

Reply Parent Score: 3

bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

I used to have this board too.
The capacitors were crap and leaked all over the place after a couple of years. I did a capacitor replacement job but the board never was stable again.

Anyways... As a developer 8 cores are AWESOME. Building applications can very efficiently use all 8 cores, building one object file per core.

Also as a developer you start to notice when your own applications aren't using all 8 cores and it's kind of annoying.

Basically all developers should have SLOW machines with 8 cores (I use an 8 core 1.6GHz setup).

Last machine I bought from dell in march this year with 8GB ram for just under $1250 shipped. That's without MS tax.

Edited 2008-09-12 20:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2