Linked by Anil Gulecha on Thu 11th Sep 2008 16:15 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu OSNews has been reporting on the Debian/Ubuntu/GNU/Opensolaris hybrid for several years. But for those of you who've never looked more closely at this interesting OS, a Nexenta developer has laid out some of its more noteworthy features and advantages.
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RE[3]: All well and good...
by erast on Thu 11th Sep 2008 23:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: All well and good..."
erast
Member since:
2006-01-31

OpenSolaris drivers quality (especially storage drivers) generally better then in Linux. The problem is that not all white-box HW is supported - but this is matter of time.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: All well and good...
by segedunum on Fri 12th Sep 2008 09:45 in reply to "RE[3]: All well and good..."
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

OpenSolaris drivers quality (especially storage drivers) generally better then in Linux.

I have no idea where you pulled that load of baloney from. A lot of Solaris's drivers have been neglected for years, and throwing in the word 'quality' won't make them better. A big part of Solaris's problem, still, is that it doesn't have the hardware support of Linux, especially on commodity x86 stuff. This comes from Linux's history (it's the reason it exists) of being a kernel and OS intended to run on that kind of hardware (and years of work), and the Unix vendors' (like Sun) insistence on not porting their operating systems to commodity hardware when they could get people to buy their really expensive stuff instead. That worked for many years and Sun got rich off it, but it has caught up now.

Much of the point of OpenSolaris is that Sun can't fill that gap themselves, and they would love Linux's drivers and kernel developers as a result.

The problem is that not all white-box HW is supported - but this is matter of time.

In all probability, it's going to be a long time. Linux has run on lots of off-the-shelf hardware for a long time, but even a few years ago, filling in the gaps of this network card, that network card, this onboard chipset, these TV cards etc. took years, a lot of driver developers and creating the environment in which to do it. There's still a lot to do as well.

I just don't see a kernel community developing for Solaris that is going to be able to achieve that.

Reply Parent Score: 1