Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 17th Sep 2008 09:15 UTC, submitted by Andrew Youll
Mac OS X If you want to run Mac OS X on a standard, non-Apple-labelled x86 box, you have various options. You can go all creative and build and install one yourself, and then be weary when installing updates from Apple. You can also buy a Mac clone from PsyStar, and then be weary of Apple's crack team of lawyers. A third option has just become available: EFI-X.
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hmm...
by sardaukar on Wed 17th Sep 2008 09:38 UTC
sardaukar
Member since:
2006-05-09

...wonder how The Law views this. I mean, it's clearly a violation of Apple's EULA that states "don't run this on non-Apple stuff". Right?

Reply Score: 0

RE: hmm...
by maxhrk on Wed 17th Sep 2008 09:48 in reply to "hmm..."
maxhrk Member since:
2005-07-24

...wonder how The Law views this. I mean, it's clearly a violation of Apple's EULA that states "don't run this on non-Apple stuff". Right?


I am sure someone will come along and cries, "Freeeeedddoooommmmm!". Anytime soon.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: hmm...
by sardaukar on Wed 17th Sep 2008 09:50 in reply to "RE: hmm..."
sardaukar Member since:
2006-05-09

Why? It's the US of A - freedom of the enterprise and so on. It's Apple's legacy on the line here - you can't just nationalize their tech "for the greater good" like some socialist European government ;) it's un-american!

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: hmm...
by Soulbender on Wed 17th Sep 2008 10:04 in reply to "hmm..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

You make the assumption that Apple can dictate what you can do with the product after you have purchased it. That's not necessarily true, just because something is in an EULA it's not automatically legal.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: hmm...
by sardaukar on Wed 17th Sep 2008 10:08 in reply to "RE: hmm..."
sardaukar Member since:
2006-05-09

Apple can indeed dictate - within the constraints of the law. And their EULA is not illegal.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: hmm...
by PowerMacX on Wed 17th Sep 2008 18:14 in reply to "RE: hmm..."
PowerMacX Member since:
2005-11-06

But you are NOT purchasing *the product*, you are purchasing a license to use it. If you could actually purchase "it" (instead of license it) then not only wouldn't they be able to tell you what you can and can not do, but they couldn't prevent you from selling copies or reverse engineering it.

That is the reason software is not "sold" - software is licensed. A license is a contract, if you don't agree to the terms of the contract you can refuse it and ask for your money back.

Reply Parent Score: 3