Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 17th Sep 2008 09:15 UTC, submitted by Andrew Youll
Mac OS X If you want to run Mac OS X on a standard, non-Apple-labelled x86 box, you have various options. You can go all creative and build and install one yourself, and then be weary when installing updates from Apple. You can also buy a Mac clone from PsyStar, and then be weary of Apple's crack team of lawyers. A third option has just become available: EFI-X.
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RE[2]: Won't fit in my mind.
by tristan on Wed 17th Sep 2008 14:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Won't fit in my mind."
tristan
Member since:
2006-02-01

except for SW - a SW product is not a car, when you buy it, it does not become yours - its property (copyright, and intellectual property over algorithms and mechanisms the SW implements) remains the company's


When I buy a television, I don't expect to take ownership of the "intellectual property" of the company that makes it. The designs of the chips inside it aren't mine, and no-one would expect them to be. The design of the menu screens aren't mine, and so on.

But at the same time, I don't expect the TV manufacturer to be able to tell which which channels I can and can't watch, or which DVD player I can connect to it.

How have we managed to get into the situation where people accept -- and in some cases even defend! -- software companies being able to tell us what to do *after we've bought their product*, in a way that would be completely unacceptable for any other type of product?

Reply Parent Score: 9

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

What about music, books, and videos?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Won't fit in my mind.
by CrazyDude1 on Wed 17th Sep 2008 17:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Won't fit in my mind."
CrazyDude1 Member since:
2007-09-17

The point is that making duplicate copies of the software is a violation and illegal. So if you buy a CD but you can't play the CD at 5 places at the same time then that is fine. You shouldn't be able to.

However telling me that I can play the CD in SONY CD player only but not in my car is clearly violation of my right of use. So now I should buy two copies of the same CD, one for my car and one for my home audio system?

Yes this is a sad situation and we got in this sad situation because we lack a technological solution to piracy without sacrificing user freedom.

The day we have such a solution, I am sure companies would be able to relax their licenses on music, books
etc.

Now about the Apple EULA, I don't think Apple EULA would hold in court if a user installs their legal copy on a custom PC (as long as it is the only copy the user is using).

Edited 2008-09-17 17:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Won't fit in my mind.
by progoth on Wed 17th Sep 2008 20:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Won't fit in my mind."
progoth Member since:
2006-10-28

How have we managed to get into the situation where people accept -- and in some cases even defend! -- software companies being able to tell us what to do *after we've bought their product*, in a way that would be completely unacceptable for any other type of product?


Some of us write software. Some of us respect the law and recognize that we'd be in trouble without it. Sometimes those people intersect, sometimes not.

Reply Parent Score: 2