Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Sun 21st Sep 2008 06:46 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Linux Greg KH, Linux kernel developer delivered a keynote in the Linux plumbing conference about the health of the ecosystem. His message was essentially that distributions that don't contribute to the ecosystem have to rely on the whims of others which is unhealthy for them. Here is an introduction the development model and some interesting statistics about the Linux kernel code. Update by TH: Rebuttals are appearing all over the web, like this one by Canonical's Matt Zimmerman ("He's refuting a claim which has, quite simply, never been made. [...] When this sort of thing happens on mailing lists, it's called trolling."), or this one by another Canonical employee, Dustin Kirkland.
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RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by -oblio- on Sun 21st Sep 2008 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
-oblio-
Member since:
2008-05-27

"Ubuntu is a great distro but they need to put more effort into contributing more back to projects code,it's really that simple considering how popular it is."

Projects need more than "code". Publicity ain't free, exposure ain't free.

Also, DOES ANYONE HERE BELIEVE THAT UBUNTU/CANONICAL IS MAKING MONEY? Not me, I think that they're bleeding money (I believe even Shuttleworth announced it)...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by apoclypse on Sun 21st Sep 2008 20:16 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

They are bleeding money and Mark has had to contribute money to the project three times as far as I can count. That's 30 million dollars out of his own pocket to a project which has still to make a red cent. Suse and RedHat have the luxury of having rich parent companies that had infused them with cash. They both sell their distro commercially while ubuntu has stuck to their guns that their distro would always be free. They could have capitilized on the popularity of the brand a long time ago and sold the distro. In-fact only recently have they started packaging Ubuntu in retail locations.

Canonical has one guy giving away his own money to a project he believes in, Suse has Novell, RedHat had TimeWarner at some point. He decided to focus his distro on what they can do best which is packaging and they seem to be doing it rather well. They don't have to contribute all that much to the kernel because they use almost the exact same kernel that Debian does, they contribute bug reports and fixes to the debian and they in turn contribute patches back to the kernel in necessary. I don't see the issue here.

This is a stupid argument, and just shows sour grapes. So what if Ubuntu is more popular, instead of complaining about how about doing something about it. How about seeing what exactly is it about Ubuntu that makes people new and old want to use it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by VistaUser on Sun 21st Sep 2008 20:26 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
VistaUser Member since:
2008-03-08

Mark Shuttleworth has a business plan. It may or may not be making money now, but you can bet your bottom dollar that he is expecting it to some day. He is not infusing money into the project as an act of charity, but as an investment.

As for the benefit of the Ubuntu marketing, if there was no Ubuntu, some other distro would take its place as a darling of friendliness.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by KAMiKAZOW on Sun 21st Sep 2008 23:29 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Suse and RedHat have the luxury of having rich parent companies that had infused them with cash.

Red Hat has a parent? Red Hat got successful on its own.
SuSE also was successful before that was bought by Novell.

They both sell their distro commercially while ubuntu has stuck to their guns that their distro would always be free.

Huh? Red Hat gives away Fedora, and Novell gives away openSUSE. Both Red Hat and SuSE were given away on magazine CDs since the 1990s.
Red Hat and Novell moth sell enterprise support contracts, but that's no different than Cannonical.

Reply Parent Score: 3