Linked by Adam S on Tue 23rd Sep 2008 14:50 UTC
Windows According to Microsoft beat writer Mary Jo Foley, word is that "Windows 7's mail, photo-management and movie-maker subsystems applets are all being replaced by optionally installable Windows Live equivalents." To many, replacing subsystems with services is a good thing. But what will the self-professed geeks think? Cnet seems to think that "Windows 7 must appeal to geeks--or else!"
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Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Tue 23rd Sep 2008 15:41 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

The problem here is the real tie-ins that many advanced users would want to see optionally installable (internet explorer being the biggie) would never move that way - they're far too integrated into the OS (and for intentional reasons too - as noted with the whole legal battle regarding IE vs Netscape).

Plus I'd be interested to see just how removed these optional components are when they're not installed. To use MS Office as an example: In the past, even when the optional components weren't installed, they'd often still be referenced within whichever Office application said component uses. Thus the users see a menu item, they can still click it, and then get greeted with a message like this:
"x is not currently installed. Please insert Office n CD"

Edited 2008-09-23 15:44 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by Laurence
by Adam S on Tue 23rd Sep 2008 16:07 in reply to "Comment by Laurence"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

Things like the help engine, and MANY components in popular apps, reference IE. Quickbooks won't install unless you have IE AND FLASH!

You can't pull IE from Windows. But things like Windows Mail, Windows Media Player, Movie Maker, Messenger, etc should be easy to strip out.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Tue 23rd Sep 2008 17:55 in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Things like the help engine, and MANY components in popular apps, reference IE. Quickbooks won't install unless you have IE AND FLASH!

You can't pull IE from Windows. But things like Windows Mail, Windows Media Player, Movie Maker, Messenger, etc should be easy to strip out.


I know that - I even said that (albeit in a more direct way):
they're far too integrated into the OS


My point was some of the crap that drive people away from windows is some of the crap that's so far burried into the OS that it simply can't be removed (for the same reasons you reitterested yourself)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by kaiwai on Wed 24th Sep 2008 04:07 in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Things like the help engine, and MANY components in popular apps, reference IE. Quickbooks won't install unless you have IE AND FLASH!

You can't pull IE from Windows. But things like Windows Mail, Windows Media Player, Movie Maker, Messenger, etc should be easy to strip out.


You realise that there are a large number of applications that use Mediaplayer as part of their application. When you mean, "I'm want it removed" - do you mean just the shell but the WHOLE lot - in the case of the media player, do you also want the CODEC's removed as well - which therefore means that we'll have vendors having to ship, most likely, out of date versions of mediaplayer with their software because the vendor can't be certain that the media player will even be installed.

Reply Parent Score: 0