Linked by Adam S on Tue 23rd Sep 2008 14:50 UTC
Windows According to Microsoft beat writer Mary Jo Foley, word is that "Windows 7's mail, photo-management and movie-maker subsystems applets are all being replaced by optionally installable Windows Live equivalents." To many, replacing subsystems with services is a good thing. But what will the self-professed geeks think? Cnet seems to think that "Windows 7 must appeal to geeks--or else!"
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RE[2]: Comment by BrendaEM
by lemur2 on Wed 24th Sep 2008 02:42 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by BrendaEM"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"The only compelling reasons to move from XP up MS's tech-tree are Directx for games, and the artificial restrictions they put on BluRay's DRM." MS didn't put the restrictions there because they wanted too, they put them there because if you want to support BlueRay, and not get slapped with a huge DMCA lawsuit, the only way is to play ball. Do you really think MS wanted to take the time to put all that crap in there when they had more important stuff to do (like WinFS)? I don't think so.


If you are to claim that DRM is only in Vista in order to support playing BluRay movies, please note that there are at least six versions of Vista, some of which claim to be targetted for business use.

Most business-use PCs will not be used for playing BluRay movies.

So where, pray tell, is the business-use version of Vista that I can buy which does not have the DRM for BluRay movies embedded?

Where is the version of Vista which does not have the DRM for BluRay movies embedded that I can buy for my PC which does not have a BluRay drive?

If there is no such version, then your DRM argument simply doesn't wash.

Edited 2008-09-24 02:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by BrendaEM
by kaiwai on Wed 24th Sep 2008 04:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by BrendaEM"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

If you are to claim that DRM is only in Vista in order to support playing BluRay movies, please note that there are at least six versions of Vista, some of which claim to be targetted for business use.


Excuse me, but the only one relevant to the consumers are Basic, Home Premium and Ultimate. Considering that all of them are the same binaries; the only difference being the key used unlocks more features - I don't know why you're making this conclusion that there are six different versions, as if there were six distinctly different and incompatible versions of Windows out there.

Btw, there is only one version for Business, its called *gasp* Windows Vista Business.

Most business-use PCs will not be used for playing BluRay movies.


And what is the purpose of that statement. Yes, we know that businesses don't use BluRay, but what relevance is it to the conversation?

So where, pray tell, is the business-use version of Vista that I can buy which does not have the DRM for BluRay movies embedded?


Considering that SecurePath adds no overhead to the operating system itself (and that person from New Zealand has been refuted so many times, its the stuff of legends) - again, I'm confused as to the point you're trying to make. You seem to be putting random statements out there without any context.

Where is the version of Vista which does not have the DRM for BluRay movies embedded that I can buy for my PC which does not have a BluRay drive?


Does it even matter. SecurePath is there, it adds no overhead, if you have no bluray drive, it isn't going to be in use. Again, where are you going with this?

Btw, learn what DRM is versus securepath.

If there is no such version, then your DRM argument simply doesn't wash.


Again, you make no sense what so ever.

Edited 2008-09-24 04:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by BrendaEM
by BluenoseJake on Wed 24th Sep 2008 16:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by BrendaEM"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

uh, there is drm in all OS's, without it, you can't play dvds. Even linux needs libraries to do it. DVDs don't decrypt themselves.

The only difference between Vista and XPs DRM is securepath, which is needed to play BlueRay disks.

If you think that only Vista Home or Ultimate can play BlueRay, you are very misinformed. Do your homework before posting please.

Reply Parent Score: 2