Linked by David Adams on Wed 1st Oct 2008 14:32 UTC
General Development Microsoft's leader of C# development, writer of the Turbo Pascal system, and lead architect on the Delphi language, Anders Hejlsberg, reveals all there is to know on the history, inspiration, uses and future direction of one of computer programming's most widely used languages - C#. Hejlsberg also offers some insight into the upcoming version of C# (C#4) and the new language F#, as well as what lies ahead in the world of functional programming.
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RE[3]: Poorly choosen name?
by Clinton on Thu 2nd Oct 2008 04:44 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Poorly choosen name?"
Clinton
Member since:
2005-07-05

Nah... Swing sucks compared to Qt or wxWindows, I think. I always thought OWL was a pretty good library too; back in the day anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 2

StaubSaugerNZ Member since:
2007-07-13

Nah... Swing sucks compared to Qt or wxWindows, I think. I always thought OWL was a pretty good library too; back in the day anyway.


Umm, how can you say Swing sucks when Swing is closer to the design spirit of OWL than almost any other toolkit out there. OWL rocked compared to MFC, unfortunately Microsoft delayed licensing Win32 to Borland which destroyed Borland's chances of competing - nothing new here, that's always the way MS rolls (and we're seeing glimpses of it from Apple as well).

Qt and wxWindows are hideous in that that use preprocessor cruft to get stuff done, so I can't see how they could possibly be superior from a design point of view. Especially now that Java2D (and Swing as a consequence) is completely hardware accelerated with pixel shaders (and no change required to the source- or byte-code of any application!).

Incidentally, C# was originally a project called "Cool" and came directlyu from Microsoft's Java implementation, though they don't want to mention it since they lost a court battle with Sun over use of the term Java.


4. The C interoperability mechanism in C# [PInvoke] is better than Java, it is easier to use and you do not need to create a wrapper DLL around the C functions you must to use.

It might be the case for clients, but in my experience writing native DLLS to be wrapped I've found C++ -> C# far more fraught with pitfalls (pinning nonsense and all the non-standard C++ macros required) than the equivalent JNI (Java Native Interface) -> Java coding (which initially looks daunting but is actually very straightforward and relatively simple).

I won't start on about wrapping .so/.jnilib since MS C# can't do it but Java can (important with the 20% computer sales that Apple are surging to).

Edited 2008-10-02 06:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2