Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 5th Oct 2008 15:57 UTC
Windows There is one thing that really pushes my buttons, one thing that is sure to send me off on a rant on life, the universe, and everything. I have a 21" widescreen 1680x1050 display - which might not be large to some of the real geeks in here, but to me, it's pretty huge. With so much screen real estate, why oh why do my friends all still insist on maximising every window they come across when they sit down behind my computer? This - and more - is the subject of the latest post on Microsoft's Engineering 7 weblog.
Thread beginning with comment 332664
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Maximizing windows...
by Novan_Leon on Mon 6th Oct 2008 15:36 UTC
Novan_Leon
Member since:
2005-12-07

I maximize Windows and I have a very large widescreen monitor. The functions I use most often are maximize, and minimize-all. I maximize for the following reasons:

1. Ninety-nine percent of tasks I perform don't require multiple windows to be open side-by-side. I would argue that most tasks don't require multiple windows to be open side-by-side. Why fiddle around with windows when you don't need it.

2. When you maximize a window, you can close it simply by shooting the mouse up in to the upper right-hand corner and clicking (the X button becoming an 'infinite' target when maximized). To close a non-maximized window you have to carefully click on the X button, require additional time and effort.

3. Generally, the more screen real estate you can dedicate to your current task, the better.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Maximizing windows...
by irbis on Mon 6th Oct 2008 16:16 in reply to "Maximizing windows..."
irbis Member since:
2005-07-08

Generally, the more screen real estate you can dedicate to your current task, the better.

I mostly agree, especially if you are using an app like a web browser that clearly benefits from more screen space. But it just depends, of course, which should be pretty obvious too. The smaller the task and the app, the less desktop space you usually need for it, like when checking some system monitor or configuring small things only. Also, it may just be easier to, for example, copy and compare stuff in several windows, if they are both open side by side.

But - if you need to use several big applications simultaneously for a long time, and without using a tiling window manager - it can simply take too much time and energy to arrange and resize several windows, side by side, and make them use all the desktop space effectively. It can be much easier to navigate from a maximized window to another (or from a virtual desktop to another), by, for example, using the Alt + Tab method, or just by clicking the taskbar.

It should be made easier and faster to tile windows on desktop environments and operating systems (Linux, Windows etc.) by just pressing a button. Still waiting for that.

Reply Parent Score: 2