Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 6th Oct 2008 10:37 UTC, submitted by John Mills
Mono Project The Mono project has released Mono 2.0. As most of you will know, Mono is an open-source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework for Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, and other operating systems. The 2.0 release comes packed with new features, the main ones being the compiler upgrade to C# 3.0 with support for LINQ, as well as the inclusion of ADO.NET 2.0, ASP.NET 2.0 and System.Windows.Forms 2.0. The release notes detail all the changes and new features.
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RE[3]: Amazing
by Soulbender on Tue 7th Oct 2008 06:31 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Amazing"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

I have but one query ... doesn't Microsoft charge a "Client Access License" fee for every separate connection to one of its IIS servers?


No, IIS does not require CAL's at all.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Amazing
by sbergman27 on Tue 7th Oct 2008 07:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Amazing"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

No, IIS does not require CAL's at all.

Thanks, in great part, to Apache. In the absence of strong competition you can bet that operators of IIS Servers would pay yearly per concurrent connection to their "Information Server" (sounds more "pay-for worthy" that way) and would just accept that situation as normal.

Even those who prefer and use Microsoft products owe a debt of gratitude to FOSS for the mercies they enjoy simply due to Microsoft not being able to do what it really would have wanted to do.

Edited 2008-10-07 07:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Amazing
by Soulbender on Tue 7th Oct 2008 13:32 in reply to "RE[4]: Amazing"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Thanks, in great part, to Apache.


Eh, I dunno.
I think it has more to do with that
a) it would be impossibly hard to keep track of, especially for large sites (think YouTube, Facebook and such)
b) to my knowledge there is not, and never has been, an HTTP server that was licensed per connection.

Perhaps if MS had been earlier into the game but at the time that MS did release IIS (as a serious product) there was already a large amount of existing servers.

Reply Parent Score: 3