Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Oct 2008 10:27 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Sunday we reported on an interview with an MSI manager, who stated that internal research had shown that the return rate for the Linux version of MSI's Wind netbook was four times as high as that of the Windows XP version. He claimed that the unfamiliarity of people with Linux was the culprit. This claim sparked some serious discussion around the net, but now MSI's statement is being repeated by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu.
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RE[2]: Comment by risbac
by fejack on Tue 7th Oct 2008 12:04 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by risbac"
fejack
Member since:
2006-06-12

Sad to say but it would suffice to put on Windows-like themes and icons and those people would'nt have a clue they are running another OS.

That's the problem I find with computer training in general: rather than teaching users about concepts, they are taught to work with a specific interface. Change the interface while keeping the same concept and everyone is lost. That would be like learning to drive a specific car make, and then be completely clueless about using any other type of car.

I agree that there should be much more communication about GNU/Linux. I remember some interactive apps HP had on its computers a decade ago, it was supposed to help new users get familiar with their OS. It might make sense to produce a DVD user manual, teaching people how to get familiar with Linux. But the problem might be having them open the DVD player app in the first place.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by risbac
by darknexus on Tue 7th Oct 2008 12:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by risbac"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Sad to say but it would suffice to put on Windows-like themes and icons and those people would'nt have a clue they are running another OS.

Sure, right up until they download the latest version of Windows Live Messenger, or any other Windows app and are unable to run it--and no, Wine is not sufficient. Or how about trying to install a printer driver, for instance, that Linux doesn't support? Then they call tech support and ask why and find out they don't actually have Windows. Now, I don't care how perfect Linux may be for netbooks, if it looks like Windows, the average customer is going to expect Windows. And further, they're not going to settle for anything else. So in this situation, a frustrated customer is now mad at the Netbook manufacturer and at Linux in general, and anyone else who may have spewed the freedom rhetoric at them--they could care less about freedom if it means they can't do what _they_ want their computer to do.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by risbac
by aldeck on Tue 7th Oct 2008 12:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by risbac"
aldeck Member since:
2006-12-07

Sad to say but it would suffice to put on Windows-like themes and icons and those people would'nt have a clue they are running another OS.


Or maybe those people are not dumb? Maybe they just tried to do something a bit advanced and had real problems? Why is it so hard to say that linux is not the best OS ever and might need some enhancements here and there?

Honestly, thinking that people don't like linux (desktop) because they don't recognize the theme is just ignoring the problems (if not insulting).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by risbac
by r_a_trip on Tue 7th Oct 2008 14:23 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by risbac"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06


Or maybe those people are not dumb? Maybe they just tried to do something a bit advanced and had real problems? Why is it so hard to say that linux is not the best OS ever and might need some enhancements here and there?

Honestly, thinking that people don't like linux (desktop) because they don't recognize the theme is just ignoring the problems (if not insulting).


Linux as a general purpose OS has no more problems than other general purpose OSes. The biggest problem with Netbook Linux is that it is Linux, thus unfamiliar, and the distributions Netbook manufacturers provide seem to be crippled beyond use.

> Anecdotal < Linpus on my Acer One was a P.O.S. > / Anecdotal <

If they could just provide a good solid distribution with working, mainstream repositories and a prominent button for INSTALL SOFTWARE on the "Desktop", Netbook Linux would not be a big issue.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by risbac
by fejack on Wed 8th Oct 2008 11:07 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by risbac"
fejack Member since:
2006-06-12

Well, by putting on "Windows-like themes and icons" I meant "replicating the Windows interface experience": most users are taught and learn how to use interfaces rather than mastering concepts.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by risbac
by wannabe geek on Tue 7th Oct 2008 14:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by risbac"
wannabe geek Member since:
2006-09-27

That would be like learning to drive a specific car make, and then be completely clueless about using any other type of car.


Notice that this is exactly how people learn to drive. I mean, the instructor can make some remarks about how something is done in other types of car, but when it comes to it you drive one specific car, and when you change cars it always takes some getting used to.

I don't think there's a way out of that. That's how the human brain works: from specific to general, not the other way around. First you learn how to do something with a specific tool, then you try a similar but slightly different tool and so on, until you slowly start to learn the basic similarities and differences, the big picture.

What I'm getting at is, if you want people to feel comfortable with Linux and other FOSS tools, you have to increase their direct contact with such tools, there's no way around that.

Reply Parent Score: 4